Saudi foreign minister: Iran must change behavior for discussions to take place

Saudi Arabia’s Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan Al-Saud attends a panel discussion during the 56th Munich Security Conference (MSC) in Munich, southern Germany, on Feb. 15, 2020. (AFP)
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Updated 16 February 2020

Saudi foreign minister: Iran must change behavior for discussions to take place

  • Saudi FM: Iran’s behavior is reckless and threatens the global economy
  • He added that the Kingdom has ambitious plans for hosting the G20 summit which will be held in Riyadh in November 2020 

MUNICH: Saudi Arabia’s Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan told the 56th Munich Security Conference on Saturday that Iran must change its behavior before any discussions between Tehran and other countries can take place.

He added that the Kingdom is also seeking de-escalation but Iran continually engages in “reckless behavior” that causes instability in the Middle East and “threatens the global economy.”

Prince Faisal added that no private messages or direct contact had taken place to ease tensions with Iran.

“Until we can talk about the real sources of that instability, talk is going to be unproductive,” the foreign minister said. 

Speaking about Yemen, Prince Faisal said that the Kingdom has always supported a political solution in the country and hopes the Houthis will put the interests of Yemen, not Iran, first.

On Saudi Arabia’s relationship with the US, the foreign minister said the two states have common interests and share a historic relationship. He added that the Kingdom has good channels for dialogue with the US Congress.

He added that the Kingdom has ambitious plans for hosting the G20 summit which will be held in Riyadh in November this year.


Pilgrims to quarantine for 14 days after Hajj

More than 41,361 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests have been conducted in the past 24 hours. (SPA)
Updated 04 August 2020

Pilgrims to quarantine for 14 days after Hajj

  • COVID-19 cases in Saudi Arabia continue to fall, officials say

JEDDAH: Pilgrims who took part in this year’s Hajj must continue wearing electronic tags so authorities can track their 14-day quarantine once they return home.

The bracelet is designed to monitor pilgrims’ adherence to quarantine, as well as monitoring and recording their health status through the “Tatamman” app.
Pilgrims were required to quarantine before embarking on the Hajj and wore the bracelets to ensure they were obeying the self-isolation rules as part of strict measures to contain the spread of coronavirus.
The country continues to experience a decline in COVID-19 cases. Recorded infections remain below the 2,000 mark for the 10th day in a row. The Kingdom reported 1,258 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday, raising the number of those infected to 280,093 so far.
There are currently 35,091 active cases and six patients were admitted to critical care units, raising the number to 2,017. There were 32 new fatalities, raising the death toll to 2,949.
There were 1,972 new recoveries recorded, raising the total number of recoveries to 242,053.
More than 41,361 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests have been conducted in the past 24 hours. The total number of PCR tests conducted to date exceeds 3.47 million.

INNUMBERS

280,093 COVID-19 cases

242,053 Recoveries

35,091 Active cases

2,949 Total deaths

3.47m PCR tests

The Ministry of Health has been carrying out daily visits to health institutions in order to assess their level of commitment to anti-coronavirus measures, such as ensuring that staff adhere to social distancing, wear masks, and adopt the health practices and crisis management mechanisms recommended by authorities to protect patients and staff.
Teams have been dispatched to supervise the compliance of health facilities’ quarantine centers across Saudi Arabia and stepped up their visits to government and private hospitals to ensure their compliance with health protocols, sample transfers and staff testing as well as ensuring that all routine surgeries are stopped.
More than 5,000 violations have been recorded and violators were referred to committees. More than 150 facilities were temporarily shut down by the ministry until the proper protocols were implemented and the violations were fixed. A number of institutions were able to resume operations after settling fines.