G20 ready to limit effects of coronavirus on global economy, Saudi finance minister

Saudi Minister of Finance Mohammed Al-Jadaan speaks during a media conference with Saudi Arabia’s central bank governor Ahmed Al-Kholifey, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Feb. 23, 2020. (AFP)
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Updated 24 February 2020

G20 ready to limit effects of coronavirus on global economy, Saudi finance minister

  • G20 will continue to take joint action to strengthen international co-operation and frameworks
  • Finance ministers agree measures to tackle global problems, coronavirus

RIYADH: The meeting of G20 finance ministers and central bank governors ended in Saudi Arabia with a determination to tackle pressing global concerns such as geopolitical and trade confrontations, as well as the challenge of the coronavirus outbreak.
The official communique — hammered out among the G20 policy-makers gathered in Riyadh over two days of discussions — said that global economic growth was expected to pick up “modestly” this year and next, on signs of improving financial conditions and some signs of easing trade tensions.
“However, global economic growth remains slow, and downside risks to the outlook persist, inching those arising from geopolitical and remaining trade tensions, and policy uncertainty. We will enhance global risk monitoring, including the recent outbreak of COVID-19 (coronavirus). We stand ready to take further action to address those risks,” the communique said.

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On so-called “trade wars” between the US and China — which was not represented at the Riyadh meeting because of the outbreak — the communiqué said: “We will continue to take joint action to strengthen international co-operation and frameworks, and also reaffirm our commitments on exchange rates.”
There was general agreement by the ministers on measures on infrastructure investment, technology development, and plans to boost domestic capital markets across the world, especially in emerging and developing countries.
But a note of caution was also sounded in several areas.The G20 finance ministers said that “we are facing a global landscape that is being rapidly transformed by economic, social, environmental, technological and demographic changes.”
Apart from that mention of the environment, there was little attention given to the contentious issue of climate change. Towards the end of the communique, the ministers and governors said: “The financial stability board (of the G20) is examining the financial stability implications of climate change.”
The finance ministers’ gathering is the first formal event in preparation for the summit of world leaders that will take place in Saudi Arabia in November, with the three key aims of empowering people, safeguarding the planet and shaping new frontiers in technology and innovation.
The international taxation system was an area of focus at the finance ministers meeting, with some countries threatening a controversial digital tax. The communique said that “we continue to support tax capacity building in developing countries,” and called on all countries to sign multilateral agreements on tax matters. “We remain committed to the full, timely and consistent implementation of the agreed financial reforms,” it added.
Other big themes of the financial G20 meeting included inclusion of youth and women in the financial process. “We support the emphasis on digital financial inclusion of under-served groups, especially youth, women and small businesses,” the communique said.
There was also strong support for the work of the global Financial Action Task Force in combating money laundering and terrorism finance. “We reiterate our strong commitment to tackle all sources, techniques and channels of these threats,” the G20 ministers said, also backing measures to tackle the financing of nuclear proliferation. “We ask the FATF to remain vigilant with respect to emerging financial technologies that may allow for new methods of illicit financing,” it added.


China’s niche LNG buyers plan billion-dollar investments, double imports amid reforms

Updated 23 October 2020

China’s niche LNG buyers plan billion-dollar investments, double imports amid reforms

SINGAPORE: A group of niche Chinese gas firms is set to make waves in the global market with plans to invest tens of billions of dollars and double imports in the next decade as Beijing opens up its vast energy pipeline network to more competition.

The companies, mostly city gas distributors backed by local authorities, are ramping up purchases of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as newly formed national pipeline operator PipeChina begins leasing third parties access to its distribution lines, terminals and storage facilities from this month.

The acceleration in demand in what is already the world’s fastest-growing market for the super-chilled fuel is a boon for producers such Royal Dutch Shell, Total and traders like Glencore faced with oversupply and depressed prices.

Just last month, UK’s Centrica signed a 15-year binding deal to supply Shanghai city gas firm Shenergy Group 0.5 million tons per year of LNG starting in 2024.

“They’re very, very interested in imports — we’re talking to a lot of them already,” said Kristine Leo, China country manager for Australia’s Woodside Energy, which signed a preliminary supply deal with private gas distributor ENN Group last year.

China could buy a record 65-67 million tons of LNG this year and is expected to leapfrog Japan to become the world’s top buyer in 2022. Imports could surge 80 percent from 2019 to 2030, according to Lu Xiao, senior analyst at consultancy IHS Markit.

State-owned Guangdong Energy Group, Zhejiang Energy Group, Zhenhua Oil and private firms like ENN were quick to take advantage of the market reforms and low spot prices for LNG, said Chen Zhu, managing director of Beijing-based consultancy SIA Energy.

Their imports will reach some 11 million tons this year, up 40 percent versus 2019, more than 17 percent of China’s total purchases, said Chen.

For years such companies have worked to expand a domestic consumer base among so-called “last mile” gas users like tens of millions of households, shopping malls and factories, but they had to rely on state majors for supplies.

With greater access to distribution networks, they are now incentivized to build their own import terminals that could account for 40 percent of the country’s LNG receiving capacity by 2030, versus 15 percent now, Chen said.

Frank Li, assistant to president of China Gas Holdings, a private piped gas distributor, said his company has been in talks with PipeChina for infr structure access as it prepares to import LNG next year.

In Southern China’s industrial hub Guangdong, companies like Guangzhou Gas, Shenzhen Gas and Guangdong Energy hold small stakes in LNG facilities operated by China National Offshore Oil Company. They imported their first cargoes from these terminals last year.

Guangzhou Gas is set to import 13 LNG shipments this year, up from five last year, after “tough negotiations” with CNOOC won it access to terminals, said Vice President Liu Jingbo.

“The reform is bringing us diversified supplies, helping us cut cost,” Liu said.

Some companies also plan to beef up trading expertise by opening offices overseas, such as in Singapore, executives said.

“Naturally, companies will be thinking of growing into a meaningful player globally,” said a trading executive with Guangdong Energy, adding that his firm looks to Tokyo Gas , Japan’s top gas distributor and trader, as a model.

The rise of niche players will erode some market share held by state giants CNOOC, PetroChina and Sinopec, prompting them to scale back gas infrastructure investment and focus on global trading, while extending into retail gas distribution at home, officials said.