Chinese restaurants starved for cash as virus hits industry

Fears over coronavirus sweeping across the country have had a devastating effect on dine-in business for eateries such as this restaurant in Beijing. (AFP)
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Updated 23 February 2020

Chinese restaurants starved for cash as virus hits industry

  • The longer the disruptions drag on, the harder it will be to avert significant damage to employment

BEIJING: It is lunch time in Beijing, but the only diner in Cindy’s Cafe is an employee having a staff meal — it has been closed for more than three weeks as China battles a deadly virus epidemic.

Restaurants are taking a huge hit as many people across the country of 1.4 billion have been either under some form of quarantine or are reluctant to venture outside since late January over fears of contagion.

At Cindy’s Cafe, in  Beijing’s Roosevelt Plaza, dine-in revenue has fallen to zero, and relying on deliveries hardly makes up the shortfall, said manager Cai Yaoyang.

“On a good day in the past, we could earn more than 1,000 yuan ($143) a day from deliveries,” Cai told AFP. “Now, it’s just around 200 to 300 yuan a day. The impact is especially big.”

He estimates losses to the company, which has more than 10 outlets in China, could be “at least a few million (yuan)” given rent and unused stock from the unexpected Lunar New Year closures. “If there is no business, staff may be asked to take more days off.” 

Many restaurants have suspended dine-ins to curb the spread of the virus, but eateries that have resumed operations remain largely empty, with people still encouraged to stay home to avoid infections.

The new coronavirus has killed more than 2,400 in China and infected nearly 77,000.

At an outlet of Bellagio Cafe, another restaurant chain, employee Zhu Xiangying told AFP it had only made 30,000 yuan in around 10 days, compared with over 200,000 yuan in normal times.

The China Cuisine Association said in a report this month that the country’s restaurant industry saw 4.67 trillion yuan ($665 billion) in catering revenue last year, with earnings over the Lunar New Year break making up over 15 percent.

With millions of people staying indoors during the festival this year, those holiday earnings have evaporated.

The hotpot chain Haidilao — which has temporarily closed its mainland China outlets — has turned to selling fresh and frozen products directly to communities.

In Yunhaiyao, a chain specializing in Yunnan cuisine, restaurant tables are piled with fresh vegetables instead of cooked dishes — ready to be packed and delivered to housing compounds.

Yunhaiyao, which has more than 100 outlets in China, now bulk-buys groceries for residents near its stores as a new income stream.

It has also rolled out a line of prepared ingredients so customers can quickly whip up Yunnan specialities while cooped up at home.

Zhao Yebule, store manager at Yunhaiyao’s Tongzhou branch in Beijing, said deliveries can rake in up to 6,000 yuan daily.

But the company is still in a pinch.

Li Jianying, a regional manager overseeing 10 outlets, said only around half of his staff were ready to resume work.

Others cannot leave their residential compounds freely or face a 14-day quarantine when they return to Beijing.

“Our sales are just about 10 percent that of regular times before the epidemic,” with delivery sales falling by half, he added.

Yunhaiyao remains worried about expenses such as rent, and has taken a 10 million yuan loan to ease cashflow pressures.

Li, however, stressed there were no plans to cut staff for now.

One way out is to “share” employees with other businesses that are enjoying an increase in demand: e-commerce platforms.

JD.com saw a 215 percent spike in fresh food sales over the Lunar New Year, while Meituan Grocery’s daily sales in Beijing tripled at its peak during the holiday.

Li estimates “a few hundred” Yunhaiyao staff have taken on short-term work with third-party firms such as supermarkets or online platforms.

Cai added Cindy Cafe was in talks to help workers find temporary employment.

JD.com and JD-backed Dada Group have offered more than 35,000 jobs, with over half being frontline roles such as couriers and drivers, while around 40 workers from restaurant chain Putien now staff Meituan Grocery as well.

Yet, the current situation remains a looming threat to jobs.

A survey by Peking and Tsinghua universities of about 1,000 small- and medium-sized enterprises, said about 85 percent of these firms could only survive up to three months on their cash reserves.

Even as policymakers extend preferential loans and introduce tax breaks authorities “won’t be able to extend life support to all,” said Capital Economics in a report on Wednesday. “The longer the disruptions drag on, the harder it will be to avert significant damage to employment.” 

As it is, the big players are hurting. Lao Xiang Ji, which has some 800 outlets, estimates it suffered at least 500 million yuan in losses, said chairman Shu Cong Xuan in a video on the company’s WeChat account.


Excavation begins at historic Dakar market in renovation project

Updated 04 August 2020

Excavation begins at historic Dakar market in renovation project

DAKAR: Heavy-duty excavators have begun to raze the famed Sandaga market, a sprawling hub of informal trade in the heart of Senegal’s capital Dakar, which the authorities want to rebuild and modernize.

The great hall, built in the Sudanese-Sahel tradition in 1933, has housed hundreds of stalls selling merchandise of all kinds, from food to craft goods. It was closed in 2013 for public safety after the edifice was weakened by several fires.

Under the watchful eyes of city and state authorities, three heavy diggers on Sunday evening began to destroy dozens of makeshift shops that had proliferated at the foot of the hall.

Police deployed in force to keep onlookers well clear of the work.

The machines threw up thick clouds of dust while they smashed market stalls and tipped loads of rubble, beams and corrugated iron into dump trucks.

The traders, whose stands overflowed into neighboring streets, had shut up shop and packed their things after a final deadline from President Macky Sall.

Many stallholders “are in the process of setting up shop at the racecourse,” in a less central part of town, Dakar-Plateau Mayor Alioune Ndoye said. Authorities have laid out 500 stalls there for use by vendors while the renovation takes place.

Shopkeepers voiced opposition over the relocation last month, telling the government that they would lose customers at the new site far from Sandaga, a curiosity for tourists which drew large crowds.

An iconic establishment lying between the old French colonial quarter and more working-class districts, Sandaga has been one of Dakar’s main trading centers for almost a century.

“It wasn’t holding up and so we decided to level it, to build an identical site while modernizing it and adding an underground car park,” Ndoye said.

Frequented daily by residents of the capital, the market also drew people from the provinces and from the West African region. Many tourists came to hunt down artisanal carvings and other artifacts.

“Sandaga cannot continue in its current state of insecurity, the irregular occupation of the public highway and insanitary conditions,” said Minister of Urban Affairs Abdou Karim Fofana, who attended the demolition on Sunday.

“If there are problems, firefighters can’t even reach the middle. The day there is a catastrophe, people would ask where the authorities were,” Fofana recently warned.

Boubacar Dieng, a 47-year-old baker, watched the ballet of the excavating machines with a benevolent gaze from his front door, just opposite the market.

“This is good. There’s no problem, because it had become filthy, not pretty,” he told AFP. “And then there was the risk of aggression by bandits who occupied the abandoned building.”