What We Are Reading Today: Deep Roots

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Updated 22 March 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Deep Roots

Authors: Avidit Acharya, Matthew Blackwell and Maya Sen

Despite dramatic social transformations in the US during the last 150 years, the South has remained staunchly conservative.
Southerners are more likely to support Republican candidates, gun rights, and the death penalty, and southern whites harbor higher levels of racial resentment than whites in other parts of the country.
Why haven’t these sentiments evolved? Deep Roots shows that the entrenched views of white southerners are a direct consequence of the region’s slaveholding history, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.
Today, southern whites who live in areas once reliant on slavery — compared to areas that were not — are more racially hostile and less amenable to policies that could promote black progress.
A groundbreaking look at the ways institutions of the past continue to sway attitudes of the present, Deep Roots demonstrates how social beliefs persist long after the formal policies that created those beliefs have been eradicated.


What We Are Reading Today: Our Minds, Our Selves: A Brief History of Psychology

Updated 30 March 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Our Minds, Our Selves: A Brief History of Psychology

Author: Keith Oatley

In Our Minds, Our Selves, distinguished psychologist and writer Keith Oatley provides an engaging, original, and authoritative history of modern psychology told through the stories of its most important breakthroughs and the men and women who made them.
The book traverses a fascinating terrain: conscious and unconscious knowledge, brain physiology, emotion, mental development, language, memory, mental illness, creativity, human cooperation, and much more.
Biographical sketches illuminate the thinkers behind key insights: Historical figures such as Darwin, Piaget, Skinner, and Turing; leading contemporaries such as Michael Tomasello and Tania Singer; and influential people from other fields, including Margaret Mead, Noam Chomsky, and Jane Goodall. Enhancing our understanding of ourselves and others, psychology holds the potential to create a better world. Our Minds, Our Selves tells the story of this most important of sciences in a new and appealing way.