Un-baaaaa-lievable: Goats invade locked-down Welsh town

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A goat is seen in Llandudno as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, Llandudno, Wales, Britain, March 31, 2020. (Reuters/Carl Recine)
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Goats are seen outside a church in Llandudno as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, Llandudno, Wales, Britain, March 31, 2020. (Reuters/Carl Recine)
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Goats are seen outside a church in Llandudno as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, Llandudno, Wales, Britain, March 31, 2020. (Reuters/Carl Recine)
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A woman takes a picture of a goat in Llandudno as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, Llandudno, Wales, Britain, March 31, 2020. (Reuters/Carl Recine)
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A herd of goats is seen in Llandudno as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, Llandudno, Wales, Britain, March 31, 2020. (Reuters/Carl Recine)
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A goat is seen outside a church in Llandudno as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, Llandudno, Wales, Britain, March 31, 2020. (Reuters/Carl Recine)
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Updated 31 March 2020

Un-baaaaa-lievable: Goats invade locked-down Welsh town

  • With humans sheltering indoors to escape the new coronavirus, mountain goats are taking advantage of the peace and space to roam in frisky clumps through the streets of Llandudno
  • Now emboldened by the lack of people and cars, the long-horned animals are venturing deeper into the seaside town

LONDON: Un-baaaaa-lievable: This wild bunch is completely ignoring rules on social distancing.
With humans sheltering indoors to escape the new coronavirus, mountain goats are taking advantage of the peace and space to roam in frisky clumps through the streets of Llandudno, a town in North Wales.
Andrew Stuart, a video producer for the Manchester Evening News, has been posting videos of the furry adventurers on his Twitter feed and they are racking up hundreds of thousands of views.
He said the goats normally keep largely to themselves, in a country park that butts up against Llandudno. But now emboldened by the lack of people and cars, the long-horned animals are venturing deeper into the seaside town. The UK has been in lockdown for the past week to combat the spread of the coronavirus.
“There’s no one around at the moment, because of the lockdown, so they take their chances and go as far as they can. And they are going further and further into the town,” Stuart told The Associated Press in an interview Tuesday from his parents’ pub in Llandudno, where he is waiting out the pandemic.
His videos show the goats munching on people’s neatly trimmed hedges and trees in front yards and loitering casually on empty streets as if they own the place.
“One of the videos on my Twitter shows that they were on a narrow side street and I was on the other side and they were scared of me. They were edging away from me. So they are still scared of people,” Stuart said. “But when there’s hardly anyone around on the big streets, they are taking their chances, they are absolutely going for it. And I think because it’s so quiet, and there’s hardly anyone around to scare them or anything, that they just don’t really care and are eating whatever they can.”
For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia, and death.


Mickey Mouse fans ‘over the moon’ as Tokyo Disney reopens

Updated 01 July 2020

Mickey Mouse fans ‘over the moon’ as Tokyo Disney reopens

  • The resort will operate at a 50 percent capacity for the foreseeable future, while parades and shows remain suspended
  • Tokyo, which has seen the highest number of coronavirus cases in Japan, allowed amusement parks to reopen in mid-June

TOKYO: Tokyo Disney Resort welcomed visitors on Wednesday for the first time in four months after being closed due to the coronavirus, with fans practicing social distance as they returned to see Mickey Mouse and other beloved characters.
Visitors in face masks queuing on floor marks clapped as the gates of the Magic Kingdom reopened, and were encouraged to clean hands, pay without cash and avoid screaming while enjoying one of Japan’s largest theme parks.
The resort will operate at a 50 percent capacity for the foreseeable future, while parades and shows remain suspended. But the new norm did not dampen the enthusiasm of Disney lovers like university student Momoka Mitsui.
“I’m over the moon just to be able to get inside Disneyland,” said the 18-year old who visited the park with a friend, both sporting face masks and matching Mickey Mouse headbands.
Tokyo, which has seen the highest number of coronavirus cases in Japan, allowed amusement parks to reopen in mid-June — later than those in some other regions — after the government lifted the national state of emergency in late May.
Other precautions being taken to protect against the disease at the park include temperature screening and the mandatory use of face masks, according to operations procedures published on the Tokyo Disney Resort’s website last week.
Staff members are also asking guests to refrain from screaming loudly on rides, in accordance with guidelines first published by Japan’s main amusement park associations in May.
Masahiko Endo, a 37-year-old care worker from Tokyo, said he agreed with the decision to limit the number of guests entering the park located some 15 kilometers away from central Tokyo.
“I hope the pandemic will be contained soon, so that Disney can go back to being a place anyone can visit,” he said, clinching a Duffy the Disney Bear toy.
Tokyo Disney Resort, consisting of both Tokyo Disneyland and Tokyo DisneySea, is the third Disney-themed park globally to reopen following the coronavirus pandemic, according to operator Oriental Land.
It attracted over 32.5 million visitors annually in 2018 and had sales of $4.06 billion in fiscal 2019.