How WWII veteran Tom Moore, 99, captured the UK's heart, raising £16m for health workers

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World War Two (WWII) veteran, 99-year-old Captain Tom Moore, with a Guard of Honour formed by members of the 1st Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, as he completes his 100th lap of his garden in Marston Moretaine, north of London, to raise money for Britain's National Health Service. (Reuters)
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World War Two (WWII) veteran, 99-year-old Captain Tom Moore, with a Guard of Honour formed by members of the 1st Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, as he completes his 100th lap of his garden in Marston Moretaine, north of London, to raise money for Britain's National Health Service. (Reuters)
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Updated 17 April 2020

How WWII veteran Tom Moore, 99, captured the UK's heart, raising £16m for health workers

LONDON: A 99-year-old British World War II veteran on Thursday completed 100 laps of his garden in a fundraising challenge for health care staff that has “captured the heart of the nation,” raising more than £16million.
“Incredible and now words fail me,” said Tom Moore, a captain who served in India, after finishing the laps of his 25-meter garden with the help of his walking frame.
Moore initially set himself the goal of raising £1,000 for a National Health Service charity in time for his 100th birthday at the end of the month, after receiving treatment for cancer and a broken hip.
But his efforts — a rare bit of good news during the global coronavirus pandemic that has killed almost 13,000 people in Britain alone — have made him a star in his own country and abroad, with the government suggesting honors may be in order.
“Thank you all for your amazing support. It has been a memorable experience. Thank you so much,” he wrote on Twitter.
The final lap of his garden in Bedfordshire, south England, was met with a guard of honor from the Yorkshire Regiment and broadcast live on British TV.
“I’m surrounded by the right kind of people,” Moore told the BBC. “I’m feeling fine, I hope you are all feeling fine too.”
Previously he has spoken of his admiration for medical staff.
“In the last war it was soldiers in uniform on the front line. This time our army are the doctors and nurses (in) uniforms,” he told ITV’s Good Morning Britain earlier this week.
“We will survive this.”
A spokesman for Prime Minister Boris Johnson said “Tom has captured the heart of the nation with his heroic effort.
“From his military contributions to his support for NHS staff, Tom has demonstrated a lifetime of bravery and compassion,” he said.
“The prime minister will certainly be looking at ways to recognize Tom for his heroic efforts.”
Johnson is currently off work recovering from coronavirus after being released on Sunday from a week-long stay in hospital.
More than 690,000 people have contributed funds, and the rush of donations caused the JustGiving page to temporarily crash.
His efforts have been lauded around the world.
“Captain Moore, we are truly impressed on this side of the pond. I think you’re remarkable, what you’ve done is an inspiration,” said US TV star Judge Judy in a video message.
“Congratulations on your fantastic success,” added Dutch violinist and conductor Andre Rieu. “I invite you and your whole family to one of my concerts.”
England cricket icon Ben Stokes said the funds raised “for the real heroes today is simply sensational.”
“I hope I’m moving just as well as you at 50, never mind 100,” he joked.
The veteran has also received online support from former Manchester United and Arsenal football captains Rio Ferdinand and Tony Adams and Olympic gold medallist Kelly Holmes.


Malaysia welcomes its first halal TV streaming service

Updated 12 min 31 sec ago

Malaysia welcomes its first halal TV streaming service

  • Service attracts more than 10,000 subscribers since July

KUALA LUMPUR: Netflix could soon have competition from a homegrown entertainment platform in Malaysia which, its makers say, will cater to Muslims’ “halal TV” needs based on Islamic values.

Dubbed “Nurflix,” the platform is Malaysia’s first Shariah-compliant streaming service and has attracted more than 10,000 subscribers since July.

Nurflix is the creation of Syah Rizal Mohamed, who wants to produce and release original content for the platform before its official launch in January.

“We spent $9.7 million for the startup, but the company will produce 1,000 (items of) original content in multiple categories like mainstream, educational, spiritual and motivational and kids, with about 12,000 episodes in the first five years of operating,” the 43-year-old CEO told Arab News.

He also plans for Nurflix to acquire content from local and international producers, as long as they align with the service’s production guidelines, with a focus on markets in Malaysia, Brunei and Singapore before setting up internationally.

“We see ourselves covering the Southeast Asian region in the next five years with our readiness to establish hubs in the Middle East and Europe to gain traction in the international market.”

He said the decision to tap into the streaming service market was driven by the rapid growth of video-on-demand media and consumers choosing this, as well as over-the-top subscription services, as their main form of entertainment. 

Consumers agreed that there was a market for a halal content platform.

“The Islamic streaming service just enriches the Islamic entertainment ecosystem because there is a niche for it,” 25-year-old public relations executive Puteri N. Balqis told Arab News.

Media consultant Amir Hadi Azmi said a Shariah-compliant streaming service was an interesting niche, particularly for more conservative users, but that the concept was not unique to Islam or Muslims.

“In America, for example, there is a service called Pure Flix which caters to more conservative Christian viewers,” he told Arab News.

Amir Muhammad, managing director of Kuman Pictures, said that as a producer, the more outlets that were made available to content producers and filmmakers, the better. Kuman Pictures, which is known for releasing horror and thriller content, could create appropriate content if need be.

“I have not seen their actual guidelines, but if they want halal horror, we will give them halal horror,” he told Arab News.

The Nurflix CEO said there would be a Content Advisory Council and that it would be headed and supervised by Habib Ali Zaenal Abidin Al Hamid and the Honorable Ustaz Raja Ahmad Mukhlis.

“Productions, including third-party content providers, will be monitored by the council to ensure the end product abides by the set guidelines. Nurflix is unique in the market because it is not just offering Islamic-guided content. The production will be monitored by the council to ensure all aspects of work are conducted in a Shariah-compliant manner.”

Although there is no formal collaboration with the Islamic Affairs Department, he said that Nurflix’s ideas and concepts had already been shared with Islamic Affairs Minister Dr. Zulkifli Mohamad Al-Bakri.

When contacted by Arab News, the director-general of Malaysia’s Department of Islamic Development Paimuzi Yahya said his department was still working on “collaborating with the streaming service” and declined to comment further.