Ships, trains, caves: Oil traders chase storage space in world awash with fuel

As onshore storage runs out, oil producers, refiners and traders are turning to tankers and floating facilities to hold excess supply. (AFP)
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Updated 23 April 2020

Ships, trains, caves: Oil traders chase storage space in world awash with fuel

  • Desperate brokers weigh up ‘oddball options’ amid plunging global demand

LONDON: Oil traders are struggling to find enough ships, railcars, caverns and pipelines to store fuel as more conventional storage facilities fill up amid abundant supply and plummeting demand due to the coronavirus crisis.

Dozens of oil tanker vessels have been booked in recent days to store at least 30 million barrels of jet fuel, gasoline and diesel at sea, acting as floating storage, as on-land tanks are full or already booked, according to traders and shipping data.

That adds to about 130 million barrels of crude already in floating storage, sources said.

Demand for oil and its products has tumbled as much as 30 percent as governments around the world have told citizens to stay home to prevent the virus spreading — grounding planes and leaving cars parked up. But the world remains awash with oil supplies.

OPEC, Russia and other major producers have forged a deal to curb production, but it will only reduce supply by about 10 percent and it does not kick in until May.

It is hard to gauge the world’s total oil storage capacity, but signs that the limit is being reached are increasingly obvious. Rising sea storage is one indicator, as it is more expensive than storing onshore and can be technically complex.

HIGHLIGHTS

•Traders books dozens of tankers to store oil at sea.

•Tankers with diesel diverted from Europe to US.

• Most European capacity already booked.

Oil producers, refiners and traders are also turning to more unusual tactics, such as storing crude and fuel in railcars in northeastern US or in unused pipelines.

Europe’s northwestern refining and storage hub still has space, but experts say most of the remaining capacity has already been booked.

Salt caverns in Sweden and other Scandinavian countries were either full or fully booked.

“We are now working on the most oddball storage locations, really tough locations where there are operational constraints,” said Krien van Beek, a broker at ODIN — RVB Tank Storage Solutions in Rotterdam.

The US has some refined products storage space left in the area from the mid-Atlantic to the Southeast and along the Gulf Coast, said Ernie Barsamian, CEO of the Tank Tiger, a US terminal storage clearinghouse.

But he said more preferable product storage sites, such as deepwater ports in New York Harbor and Houston, which are close to the demand centers, were no longer available.

“The big tanks where you pull a ship in and empty the whole thing, that’s all gone. What you have is pots and pans,” he said.

In the US, onshore storage tanks are mostly reserved for local refineries which are using railcars to store crude, as well as gasoline and diesel.

“Even the railcars are going to get stacked with product,” said a US-based broker who asked to remain anonymous.

In hubs with a little space left, such as Chicago, tank operators can charge a premium. 

With the market oversupplied, oil prices have plunged to their lowest levels in two decades. This week, US Western Texas Intermediate made an unprecedented dive into negative territory, so sellers had to pay people to take it.

Despite the plummeting crude price, some refineries which are able to find space can still make money producing fuel.

“Margins are OK because there is more flexibility in the products market relative to crude,” a senior official at a European refinery said.

And nimble traders are creating new storage options. Tanker vessels carrying more than
1.5 million barrels of diesel have been diverted in recent days from their European destinations to the New York region to anchor in storage.


Oil giants’ production cuts come to 1m bpd as they post massive write-downs

Updated 10 min 7 sec ago

Oil giants’ production cuts come to 1m bpd as they post massive write-downs

  • Crude output worldwide dropped sharply after the market crashed in April

LONDON: The world’s five largest oil companies collectively cut the value of their assets by nearly $50 billion in the second quarter, and slashed production rates as the coronavirus pandemic caused a drastic fall in fuel prices and demand.

The dramatic reductions in asset valuations and decline in output show the depth of the pain in the second quarter. Fuel demand at one point was down by more than 30 percent worldwide.

Several executives said they took massive write-downs because they expect demand to remain impaired for several more quarters as people travel less and use less fuel due to the ongoing global pandemic.

Of those five companies, only Exxon Mobil did not book sizeable impairments. But an ongoing reevaluation of its plans could lead to a “significant portion” of its assets being impaired, it reported, and signal the elimination of 20 percent or 4.4 billion barrels of its oil and gas reserves.

By contrast, BP took a $17 billion hit. It said it plans to recenter its spending in coming years around renewables and less on oil and natural gas.

Weak demand means oil producers must revisit business plans, said Lee Maginniss, managing director at consultants Alarez & Marsal. He said the goal should be to pump only what generates cash in excess of overhead costs.

“It’s low-cost production mode through the end of 2021 for sure, and to 2022 to the extent there are new development plans being contemplated,” Maginniss said.

London-based BP has previously said it plans to cut its overall output by roughly 1 million barrels of oil equivalent (BOEPD) by the end of 2030 from its current 3.6 million BOEPD.

Of the five, Exxon is the largest producer, with daily output of 3.64 million BOEPD, but its production dropped 408,000 BOEPD between the first and second quarters. The five majors, which include Chevron Corp, Royal Dutch Shell and Total SA, also cut capital expenditures by a combined $25 billion between the quarters.

Crude output worldwide dropped sharply after the market crashed in April. The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries agreed to cut output by nearly 10 million barrels a day to balance out supply and demand in the market.