Jordan to continue night curfew even after virus outbreak ‘contained’

In this March 21, 2020 file photo, the streets of the Jordanian Capital are seen empty after the start of a nationwide curfew, amid concerns over the coronavirus pandemic, in Amman, Jordan. (AP)
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Updated 05 May 2020

Jordan to continue night curfew even after virus outbreak ‘contained’

  • Amjad Adailah said the Cabinet would also continue to impose a weekend lockdown

AMMAN: Jordan is to continue to impose a daily night curfew even after containing the spread of the new coronavirus and allowing businesses to reopen and more movement, a government spokesman said on Tuesday.
Amjad Adailah said the Cabinet, which imposed a curfew on March 21 after enacting emergency laws that gave the government sweeping powers, would also continue to impose a weekend lockdown.
“We have contained the outbreak but the danger is real and the possibility of its return is real and serious,” Adailah said.
Jordanians took to the streets after a ban was lifted on driving and many businesses reopened in a rapid return to normality after the authorities relaxed a tough nearly 50-day curfew to stem the spread of the coronavirus.
Prime Minister Omar al Razzaz said in remarks on state television that the country’s early tight lockdown measures had brought results that were far better than expected.
The government has not registered any coronavirus cases for the eighth day in a row, Razzaz added. The country has had a total of 465 cases and nine deaths.


Sudan to allow drinking alcohol for non-Muslims, ban FGM

Updated 39 min 44 sec ago

Sudan to allow drinking alcohol for non-Muslims, ban FGM

  • Alcoholic drinks have been banned since Islamic law was introduced in 1983

KHARTOUM: Sudan will permit non-Muslims to consume alcohol and strengthen women’s rights, including banning female genital mutilation (FGM), its justice minister said late on Saturday, in a reversal of almost four decades of hard-line Islamist policies.
About 3% of Sudan’s population is non-Muslim, according to the United Nations.
Alcoholic drinks have been banned since former President Jaafar Nimeiri introduced Islamic law in 1983, throwing bottles of whisky into the Nile in the capital Khartoum.
The transition government which took over after autocrat Omar Al-Bashir was toppled last year has vowed to lead Sudan to democracy, end discrimination and make peace with rebels.
Non-Muslims will no longer be criminalized for drinking alcohol in private, Justice Minister Nasredeen Abdulbari told state television. For Muslims, the ban will remain. Offenders are typically flogged under Islamic law.
Sudan will also decriminalize apostasy and ban FGM, a practice which typically involves the partial or total removal of the external genitalia of girls and women, he said.
Women will also no longer need a permit from male members of their families to travel with their children.
Nimeiri’s introduction of Islamic law was major catalyst for a 22-year-long war between Sudan’s Muslim north and the mainly Christian south that led in 2011 to South Sudan’s secession.
Bashir extended Islamic law after he took power in 1989.
Sudanese Christians live mainly in Khartoum and in the Nuba mountains near the South Sudan border. Some Sudanese also follow traditional African beliefs.
The transition government led by Abdalla Hamdok runs the country in an uneasy coalition with the military which helped remove Bashir after months of mass protests.