Dubai denies being in talks with Abu Dhabi for support from state fund Mubadala

Reuters earlier reported that the governments of Abu Dhabi and Dubai are discussing ways to prop up Dubai’s economy, through support from state fund Mubadala. (Reuters)
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Updated 16 May 2020

Dubai denies being in talks with Abu Dhabi for support from state fund Mubadala

  • Reuters published a story without further investigating the accuracy of this claim and verifying the trustworthiness of its source

CAIRO: Dubai has denied being in talks with Abu Dhabi’s government for support from state fund Mubadala, Dubai Media Office reported on Twitter.
“The Government of Dubai denies a news report from Reuters that claims Dubai is in talks with Abu Dhabi for support from state fund Mubadala,” the Dubai emirate’s communications unit said on social media.
“Reuters published a story without further investigating the accuracy of this claim and verifying the trustworthiness of its source.”


Reuters earlier reported that the governments of Abu Dhabi and Dubai are discussing ways to prop up Dubai’s economy by linking up assets in the two emirates, citing three sources familiar with the matter.
The wires agency also quoted on of its sources as saying that any support from Abu Dhabi agreed now would be “orchestrated through mergers of assets where Abu Dhabi and Dubai compete directly or where they have joint ownerships”.
“The most likely deal to happen in the near term is a merger of the local stock markets,” the source said, adding that bank mergers were also possible.
A second source confirmed the talks and said Mubadala, which manages around $230 billion in assets, would make “a big move into Dubai”, but gave no details.

 


‘Lower for longer’: Fed’s warning on interest rates

Updated 24 September 2020

‘Lower for longer’: Fed’s warning on interest rates

  • The Fed cut rates to near zero in March and took other steps to combat a recession

WASHINGTON: Federal Reserve Vice Chair Richard Clarida said on Wednesday that policymakers “are not even going to begin thinking” about raising interest rates until inflation hits 2 percent, comments aimed at cementing the public’s understanding of the US central bank’s new approach to monetary policy.

“Rates will be at the current level, which is basically zero, until actual observed PCE inflation has reached 2 percent,” Clarida told Bloomberg Television, referring to the Fed’s preferred measure of prices. PCE inflation tends to be somewhat lower than the better-known consumer price index.

“We could actually keep rates at this level beyond that. But we are not even going to begin thinking about lifting off, we expect, until we actually get observed inflation equal to 2 percent. Also we want our labor market indicators to be consistent with maximum employment.”

The Fed cut rates to near zero in March and took other steps to combat a recession that took hold as businesses shut down and consumers stayed home to fight the spread of the coronavirus.

Clarida said that with further government aid from Congress and the steps the Fed has already taken, the US economy could return from the current “deep hole” of joblessness and weak demand in perhaps three years.

To aid that process, the Fed in late August revised its approach to monetary policy to commit to lower rates for longer periods of time, allowing the risk of higher inflation to try to encourage a stronger economic recovery and more job gains for workers. A follow-up policy statement last week gave more specific guidance about future decisions, but questions remain about what the new approach will mean in practice.

Clarida said there should not be any confusion: Rates will not increase until labor markets recover and prices hit the Fed’s target.

“So lower for longer, and we have given some observable metrics,” for judging when a rate hike debate might begin, he said.

Decisions about any possible overshoot of inflation are “academic” at this point, he added, and can be made once the economy rebounds.