UK set to scale back Huawei role in 5G network: report

Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei has been at the forefront of US-China trade tensions. (AFP)
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Updated 23 May 2020

UK set to scale back Huawei role in 5G network: report

  • The coronavirus pandemic has amplified scepticism over the role of the Chinese company in British infrastructure

LONDON: Britain will reduce Chinese tech giant Huawei’s controversial involvement in its 5G network in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak, the Daily Telegraph reported Saturday.
Prime Minister Boris Johnson gave the green light to Huawei’s participation in January, despite widespread domestic opposition and pressure from the United States.
But he has now instructed officials to draft plans that would see China’s involvement in Britain’s infrastructure end by 2023, according to the report.
Washington has pushed hard for countries to bar Huawei from building their next generation 5G mobile networks, claiming its equipment can be used to spy for Beijing.
Johnson is due to meet US President Donald Trump next month for the G7 summit, with Britain hoping to scale up talks over a bilateral trade deal.
MPs in Johnson’s own party have led the charge against Huawei’s involvement, a movement that has gathered pace following China’s actions during the coronavirus crisis.
“He has taken a great many soundings from his own MPs on this issue and shares their serious concerns. The deal was struck before the pandemic hit but coronavirus has changed everything,” an unnamed source told the paper.
Downing Street said they would not comment on the latest report.
 


UK, France, Germany ‘regret’ latest US move on Iran

Iranians shop for vegetables in the capital city of Tehran, on May 26, 2020. Iran on May 25, reopened major Shiite shrines across the Islamic republic, more than two months after they were closed, as it reported its lowest deaths from coronavirus since March. (AFP)
Updated 25 min 52 sec ago

UK, France, Germany ‘regret’ latest US move on Iran

  • Iranian Atomic Energy Organization spokesman Behrouz Kamalvandi said Thursday Washington’s “desperate” decision was aimed at distracting attention from its “continued defeats at the hands of Iran”

LONDON: Britain, France and Germany on Saturday strongly condemned a US decision to end sanctions waivers for companies from nations that remain in a nuclear accord with Iran.
The waivers were part of the landmark agreement signed with Tehran in 2015 that sought to limit Iran’s nuclear ambitions in return for lifting crippling economic sanctions.
They allowed European, Chinese and Russian companies to work on the conversion of a heavy water reactor in Arak, a major industrial city in western Iran.
“We deeply regret the US decision to end the three waivers covering key JCPOA nuclear projects in Iran,” read a joint statement from the three European powers.
“These projects, endorsed by UN Security Council Resolution 2231, serve the non-proliferation interests of all and provide the international community with assurances of the exclusively peaceful and safe nature of Iranian nuclear activities.”
US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced the decision to end the waivers earlier this week.
The nuclear deal, known formally as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), was signed by the US, Britain, China, France, Germany and Russia as well as Iran.

HIGHLIGHT

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced the decision to end the waivers earlier this week.

However, the US pulled out in 2018 and the latest decision on waivers, following further sanctions, raises the prospect that the agreement could collapse.
Russia has also attacked the decision by Pompeo, with Moscow claiming US foreign policy was becoming “more dangerous and unpredictable.”
In Tehran, Iranian foreign ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi condemned the US decision as a “flagrant violation of Resolution 2231 and the Charter of the United Nations.”
He said Iran was ready to “take legal action and act appropriately” if the move harms its nuclear rights, without elaborating.
Iranian Atomic Energy Organization spokesman Behrouz Kamalvandi said Thursday Washington’s “desperate” decision was aimed at distracting attention from its “continued defeats at the hands of Iran.”