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Family members, from right to left, Suhail Lahta, Ghita Naoui, Fadila Lahta, Zineb Jammar, and Fatima Naoui drink tea and watch TV as they spend the first day of Eid in lockdown due to the Coronavirus pandemic, in Sale, Morocco, Sunday, May 24, 2020. (AP)
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Afifa, right, and her husband, Moustafa, video call with their relatives on the first day of Eid in lockdown due to the Coronavirus pandemic, in Casablanca, Morocco, Sunday, May 24, 2020. (AP)
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Yousra Sandabad and her parents, Moustafa and Afifa, video call their relatives as they enjoy Moroccan sweets on the first day of Eid in lockdown due to the Coronavirus pandemic, in Casablanca, Morocco, Sunday, May 24, 2020. (AP)
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Yousra Sandabad, left, and her parents, Moustafa and Afifa, go out for some fresh air on their rooftop on the first day of Eid in lockdown due to the Coronavirus pandemic, in Casablanca, Morocco, Sunday, May 24, 2020. (AP)
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Moroccan sweets are displayed on a table inside the home of Ghita Naoui as she and her relatives spend Eid in lockdown due to the Coronavirus pandemic, in Sale, Morocco, Sunday, May 24, 2020. (AP)
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A picture taken on May 24, 2020 shows a deserted street in Rabat, as the country is under lockdown to stop the spread of the Covid-19 disease caused by the novel coronavirus, on the first day of the Eid al-Fitr feast marking the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. (AP)
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A picture taken on May 24, 2020 shows a deserted street in Rabat, as the country is under lockdown to stop the spread of the Covid-19 disease caused by the novel coronavirus, on the first day of the Eid al-Fitr feast marking the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. (AP)
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Updated 26 May 2020

Confined Moroccans find new ways to celebrate Eid

RABAT: Instead of mass prayers and large family gatherings filled with colorful clothes, gifts and traditional foods, millions of Moroccan Muslims celebrated Eid Al-Fitr at home, subdued and isolated amid their country’s newly extended coronavirus lockdown.

The mood was somber for the normally joyous holiday marking the end of the holy month of Ramadan, but also mixed with gratitude that Morocco's brush with the virus has been so far milder than those in the U.S. or Europe.

And Moroccan families found ways to make Eid special, as Muslims around the world adapted the religious festival because of social distancing rules and life under confinement.