What We Are Eating Today: Saudi Arabia's Pao: healthy food with a bohemian vibe

What We Are Eating Today: Saudi Arabia's Pao: healthy food with a bohemian vibe
Pao is located at Al-Takhassusi Street in Riyadh
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Updated 29 May 2020

What We Are Eating Today: Saudi Arabia's Pao: healthy food with a bohemian vibe

What We Are Eating Today: Saudi Arabia's Pao: healthy food with a bohemian vibe

Are you tired of eating unhealthy food? Have you gained weight during Ramadan and want to get back into shape? With its tropical bohemian vibes and wide array of sandwiches and juices, Pao (@pao_ksa) is one of your best options for healthy food.

Located at Al-Takhassusi Street in Riyadh, Pao is famous for its Acai bowls, which you can customize according to your own tastes. One of their most delicious selections is the Fruity Acai, which contains coconut flakes, mango, kiwi, and strawberry.

Grilled halloumi is a great choice for vegetarians and can be combined with eggplant, tomato or basil pesto and fresh arugula.

Pao has an impressive variety of sandwiches, but one of its signature choices is the Spicy Tuna with its crispy bread stuffed with tuna, jalapeno, and tabasco.

Pao gets quite creative with their salads, like their fattah and crispy sweet potato salad. One of their most popular picks is the Thai salad with red and white cabbage, lettuce, coriander, carrots, broccoli, rice noodles, and chicken.

Pao also offers juices. Its ginger boost juice with apple and mint is a refreshing option to start your day off right. You can order from Pao through the Chefz app and Jahez.


Fraudsters up their game, posing as bank officials on the phone in Saudi Arabia

Fraudsters up their game, posing as bank officials on the phone in Saudi Arabia
Vishing that occurs during a telephone call aims to provoke fear in the victim so that customers will be more susceptible to giving out personal, financial, or security details. (shutterstock)
Updated 18 January 2021

Fraudsters up their game, posing as bank officials on the phone in Saudi Arabia

Fraudsters up their game, posing as bank officials on the phone in Saudi Arabia
  • The Saudi Central Bank (SAMA) has warned bank customers, both citizens and expatriates, not to fall victim to financial frauds being perpetrated by scammers

JEDDAH: Fraudsters have developed a new scam, contacting residents in Saudi Arabia and pretending to be bank staffers requesting customer details.
A number of Arab News staff have received such calls in recent weeks. One caller spoke Urdu while two other callers posing as senior officials from the headquarters of the bank spoke in English and Arabic with a local accent.
They used phone numbers that appeared to be local numbers but upon calling back, the lines failed to connect.
The racketeers collect phone numbers of customers and ring them up, saying that their bank account or ATM card requires immediate updating. The scammers use the information provided to gain access to their bank accounts.
Speaking to Arab News, Talat Zaki Hafiz, secretary-general of the Media and Banking Awareness Committee of Saudi banks, said: “Saudi banks represented by the Media and Banking Awareness Committee have repeatedly warned bank customers not to react to stray phone calls of any kind coming from unknown sources that ask to update their banking record or personal information.” He further confirmed that banks do not request such information through phone calls or SMS messages.
Mohammed Khurram Khan, a professor of cybersecurity at the King Saud University in Riyadh, told Arab News: “Phishing, an online scam which targets users through emails where individuals are encouraged to click on a link that takes them to fraudulent sites, was troubling people. Now it’s a different kind of scam known as ‘vishing,’ over-the-phone phishing, where scammers persuade users to share their banking information by impersonating a bank official.”

HIGHLIGHT

The racketeers collect phone numbers of customers and ring them up, saying that their bank account or ATM card requires immediate updating. The scammers use the information provided to gain access to their bank accounts.

Vishing that occurs during a telephone call aims to provoke fear in the victim so that customers will be more susceptible to giving out personal, financial, or security details.
Sharing his experience Zafar Hasan, an e-learning consultant in Riyadh, said: “I received a call from someone on an unknown mobile number who introduced himself as a bank employee and told me that my ATM card was going to be blocked. It required an immediate update so I should give my Iqama number (residence permit number) and sixteen-digit ATM card number. I felt something was fishy, so I told him that I would go personally to the bank to update the card.”
The Saudi Central Bank (SAMA) has warned bank customers, both citizens and expatriates, not to fall victim to financial frauds being perpetrated by scammers.
SAMA called on bank customers to take information only from the official channels of the bodies regulating the Kingdom’s financial and investment sectors and inform the competent security authorities about such fraudulent attempts.