Prof. Tariq Ahmed Madani, Saudi academic

Prof. Tariq Ahmed Madani
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Updated 03 June 2020

Prof. Tariq Ahmed Madani, Saudi academic

Prof. Tariq Ahmed Madani is head of the Infection Control and Environmental Health Unit at the Jeddah-based King Abdul Aziz University Hospital. 

Madani obtained his bachelor’s degree in medicine and surgery (MBBS) in 1988 at the King Abdul Aziz University’s (KAU) faculty of medicine. A year later, he joined the university as a faculty member. In 1989, his degree was approved by the Medical Council of Canada’s Evaluating Examination.

He served as a medical resident at the University of Ottawa, Canada, between 1991 and 1994. Madani received a fellowship in infectious diseases from the University of Manitoba, Canada, in 1996. He served as an assistant professor at KAU from 1996 to 2001.

Madani obtained certifications in internal medicine and infectious disease from the American Board of Internal Medicine in 2004 and 2006, respectively. He also obtained a fellowship in internal medicine from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and a fellowship in infectious diseases from the same institute.

From 2000 to 2007, he was assigned to work as an adviser to the Saudi health minister. From 2002 to 2007, he served as an associate professor at KAU’s faculty of medicine, where he taught courses on internal medicine and infectious diseases.

In April 2014, the former acting health minister, Adel Fakieh, appointed Madani as an adviser to the Health Ministry to help contain the MERS coronavirus. 

He received a letter of appreciation and an award of SR100,000 ($26,666) in addition to three salaries from the late King Fahd for diagnosing Rift Valley fever in Saudi Arabia and designing a strategy to control the epidemic. 


Saudi bridge continues to aid stricken in Lebanon

KSRelief provided urgent food supplies to affected people living in the areas adjacent to the port, covering 500 families. (SPA)
Updated 10 August 2020

Saudi bridge continues to aid stricken in Lebanon

  • So far, 290 tons of aid transported to provide urgent humanitarian needs to people affected by explosion

JEDDAH: Aid continues to flow into the Lebanese capital Beirut, as the fourth Saudi air bridge plane operated by the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) arrived on Sunday.
Ninety tons of emergency aid was flown in on the flight, including medical materials and equipment, foodstuff and shelter supplies. Medicines, burn treatments, medical solutions, masks, gloves, sterilizers and other surgical materials will be distributed by special teams on the ground.
The plane also carried food baskets that included flour and dates as well as shelter materials such as tents, blankets, mattresses, and utensils.
So far, 290 tons of aid has been transported from Saudi Arabia to Lebanon as per the directives of King Salman to provide urgent humanitarian aid to the Lebanese people affected by the explosion at the Port of Beirut.
This aid was provided based on an assessment report of the necessary humanitarian needs resulting from the explosion, in coordination with the Saudi Embassy in Beirut, and the KSRelief branch in Lebanon.
This comes as an extension of the efforts made by Saudi Arabia to show solidarity with the Lebanese people and to provide relief to those affected by the disaster.

FASTFACT

So far, 290 tons of aid has been transported from Saudi Arabia to Lebanon as per the directives of King Salman to provide urgent humanitarian aid to the Lebanese people affected by the explosion at the Port of Beirut.

KSRelief provided urgent food supplies to affected people living in the areas adjacent to the port on Sunday, covering 500 families.
Saudi Ambassador to Lebanon Waleed bin Abdullah Bukhari told Arab News that special committees would oversee and review reports on the Lebanese people’s needs.
“Aid will continue to flow into Lebanon after assessing the required needs of the Lebanese people in cooperation with the relevant authorities in Lebanon,” he said.
Countries around the world have come together to help Lebanon in the wake of the explosion on Aug. 4, which devastated large areas of Beirut, damaging and destroying infrastructure, buildings and homes, including all port facilities and the country’s grain storage silos.