Tennis champion Rafael Nadal not sure about 2020 US Open

Tennis champion Rafael Nadal not sure about 2020 US Open
Rafael Nadal holds the trophy after his win over Daniil Medvedev during the men’s singles Finals match at the 2019 US Open on September 8, 2019. (AFP)
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Updated 04 June 2020

Tennis champion Rafael Nadal not sure about 2020 US Open

Tennis champion Rafael Nadal not sure about 2020 US Open
  • ‘If you (ask) me today, I will say, ‘No’’
  • Tennis, like most sports, has been on hold since March because of the COVID-19 outbreak

If it weren’t for a pandemic-caused postponement, the French Open would have been in Week 2 now, and Rafael Nadal might still have been in contention for a 20th Grand Slam title. Instead, he’s home in Spain, practicing lightly — and wondering along with everyone else in tennis whether the next Grand Slam tournament, the US Open, will be held.
“If you (ask) me today, I will say, ‘No,’” Nadal said with a shake of his head during a video conference call with The Associated Press and other wire services Thursday.
“In a couple of months? I don’t know. Hopefully, ‘Yes,’” he continued. “But we need to wait probably until we have more clear information about how the virus evolves and how the situation is going to be in New York in a couple of months. Because, of course, New York has been one of the places that have been very strongly hit by the virus. So, let’s see.”
Nadal thinks there are two key requirements for the US Open to happen — and for tennis to resume anywhere: assurances about being protected from the coronavirus and having everyone be able to fly internationally.
“We can’t come back until the situation is completely safe enough in terms of (health),” he said, “and fair enough in terms of all the players from every single (country) can travel to the tournaments under safe circumstances to compete.”
Tennis, like most sports, has been on hold since March because of the COVID-19 outbreak.
The ATP and WTA tours are suspended at least until late July. The French Open’s start was pushed back from May until September. Wimbledon was canceled for the first time in 75 years.
A decision about the US Open is expected within weeks; the tournament’s main draw is scheduled to begin in New York on Aug. 31.
The US Tennis Association’s chief executive for pro tennis, Stacey Allaster, told said on Saturday that contingency plans include providing charter flights from around the world for players and requiring proof of negative virus tests before travel.
“I really believe we need to be patient, be responsible,” Nadal said, “and we need to (be) calm and do the things the right way.”
Nadal, who turned 34 on Wednesday, said he didn’t touch a racket for more than two months before recently resuming training in a less-intense way than normal and “not testing my body.”
“I am going very slow, step by step, not playing every single day and not practicing much,” he said.
Usually at this time of year, he is exerting himself on the red clay of Roland Garros, where he has won a record 12 of his 19 major championships.
He’s neither optimistic nor pessimistic right now about whether the French Open can be played later in 2020.
“I miss playing tennis. I miss playing the tournament that I love the most,” Nadal said. “But at the same time, my mind is not thinking about that. My mind is focused on trying to recover the normal life. The first thing we have to do is recover the normal.”


Adailton fires Tokyo into Asian Champions League last 16

Updated 04 December 2020

Adailton fires Tokyo into Asian Champions League last 16

Adailton fires Tokyo into Asian Champions League last 16

DOHA, Qatar: Brazilian midfielder Adailton scored a brilliant solo goal in the first half as FC Tokyo edged past Perth Glory 1-0 to seal the second round-of-16 spot from Group F in the Asian Champions League on Thursday.

South Korean giants Ulsan Hyundai had already made the cut as guaranteed group winners, leaving FC Tokyo and Shanghai Shenhua scrapping for second place with both teams on seven points from five matches.

But Shanghai Shenhua fell to a crushing 4-1 defeat by Ulsan on Thursday to exit the tournament, while FC Tokyo’s narrow win over Perth Glory helped them maintain their record of qualifying for the knockout phase every year since their continental debut in 2012.

Adailton was in the thick of the action in the very first minute at the Education City Stadium when he went for a spectacular bicycle kick off a cross from Takuya Uchida only to see the ball sail over the goalpost.

But he compensated for that miss in style seven minutes later with a brilliant 30-yard burst down the left flank, scoring with a curling shot past Perth goalkeeper Liam Reddy.

Two minutes later, Adailton found himself in a great position to strike again but his powerful effort from outside the penalty area saw Reddy producing a fine save.

Perth Glory took control of the match in the second half but could not get past the Tokyo defence, ending up at the bottom of the table with just one point from six matches.

FC Tokyo coach Kente Hasegawa said he always had confidence in his team’s abilities.

“Today we are very happy about qualifying for the next round. Some players who didn’t play much before played today and Adailton scored a very good goal,” said Hasegawa.

“We tried to score more goals in the second half but also we knew the result of the other game (Ulsan were leading 2-0 against Shenhua at half time), so we were more comfortable.”

Perth Glory’s Cristian Ola said fatigue was a big factor for his team’s poor show.

“Not happy with the result but happy with our boys’ efforts and display considering it was their fifth game in a short space of time which is not something we are used to,” said Ola.

“Fatigue was our biggest opponent today but congratulations to FC Tokyo.”

Shanghai Shenhua’s defeat by Ulsan Hyundai meant they failed to make the last 16 for the first time since 2006.

Having booked their knockout berth earlier, Ulsan made several changes to their lineup but Park Jeong-in and Lee Sang-heon put them 2-0 ahead at the break.

Bjorn Johnsen then added a second-half brace as the Koreans recorded their fifth straight win.

“After we qualified for the round of 16, I expected a few players might lose concentration but all the players concentrated and played well,” said Ulsan coach Kim Do-hoon.

“We had a lot of young players and they did their job. I asked them to play aggressively with combination play and high press, and they did it all very well.”

Shanghai Shenhua’s Choi Kang-hee said the Covid-19 pandemic meant they faced a number of difficulties in playing the competition.

“We understand it’s a pandemic. It’s a special time, and we have to play in this kind of way, but we hope in the future the tournament won’t be played with such a tight fixture list.”