Top supplier Malaysia sees no quick end to shortages in $8bn gloves industry

Top supplier Malaysia sees no quick end to shortages in $8bn gloves industry
A couple wearing face masks amid the coronavirus pandemic attend their wedding ceremony at a mosque in Banda Aceh. (AFP)
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Updated 05 June 2020

Top supplier Malaysia sees no quick end to shortages in $8bn gloves industry

Top supplier Malaysia sees no quick end to shortages in $8bn gloves industry
  • The global disposable gloves market was valued at $7.6 billion last year and is expected to reach $11.8 billion by 2025

KUALA LUMPUR: A global shortage of medical gloves due to a coronavirus-driven surge in demand will carry over into next year, Malaysia, the world’s biggest gloves supplier, said on Thursday, warning buyers to be wary of scammers promising quick supplies.

World consumption of the personal protective equipment is estimated to jump more than 11 percent to 330 billion pieces this year, two thirds of which are likely to be supplied by Malaysia, its rubber glove manufacturers association (MARGMA) said.

It recently received more than a dozen reports of frauds and fake agents claiming to represent member companies for glove supplies. Counterfeit company letters were produced to appoint bogus agents or potential customers were quoted “ridiculous” prices with a promise to cut short delivery time.

“Buyers are reminded that while glove prices have soared and demand is overwhelming, the industry’s supply is being fully booked until early next year,” MARGMA President Denis Low said in a statement.

“MARGMA foresees the shortage of gloves due to overwhelming demand this year to spill into 2021.”

The global disposable gloves market was valued at $7.6 billion last year and is expected to reach $11.8 billion by 2025, according to VynZ Research.

MARGMA, whose members include top-two players Top Glove Corp. and Supermax Corp, also said worker safety and welfare were being monitored “critically” as pressure increases to step up production.

Last week, a group of European politicians urged the European Union trade commissioner to make sure higher demand does not become an excuse for exploiting workers, who come mainly from Bangladesh, Myanmar and Nepal.

The US in March lifted a ban on imports from Malaysian glove maker WRP Asia Pacific after accusing it of using forced labor.

Developed economies, home to only a fifth of the world’s population, account for nearly 70 percent glove demand due to their stringent medical standards. 


Saudi-Yemeni collaboration aims to support housing, education and employment sectors

Princess Lamia bint Majed and ambassador Mohammed bin Saeed Al-Jaber. (Supplied)
Princess Lamia bint Majed and ambassador Mohammed bin Saeed Al-Jaber. (Supplied)
Updated 16 January 2021

Saudi-Yemeni collaboration aims to support housing, education and employment sectors

Princess Lamia bint Majed and ambassador Mohammed bin Saeed Al-Jaber. (Supplied)
  • Initiative will offer more than 200 unemployed youth vocational training opportunities, while 1,600 new job opportunities will be created

RIYADH: The Saudi Development and Reconstruction Program for Yemen (SDRPY) has signed a number of agreements with Alwaleed Philanthropies, the charitable organization set up by Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Al-Saud, to address the housing and education needs of 4,860 Yemeni people.

The first memorandum of cooperation (MoC) is with UN-Habitat, represented by the program’s executive director Maimunah M. Sharif, to launch the Adequate Housing Project.

Coordinated with the Yemeni government, the housing project is restoring 600 housing units for low-income households in Aden and surrounding areas. The project is expected to directly benefit up to 4,200 people, as well as improving the general social and economic conditions of the surrounding neighbourhoods.

Moreover, the initiative will offer more than 200 unemployed youth vocational training opportunities, while 1,600 new job opportunities will be created during the project.

The second MoC is with Education for Employment (EFE) and will focus on a project entitled Building the Future for Yemeni Youth.

SDRPY’s Supervisor, Ambassador Mohammed bin Saeed Al-Jaber, said: “The initiatives are part of our efforts to assist the government in Yemen by restoring housing, offering placement programs, job training, and self-employment opportunities to youth, under the directives of King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.”

Secretary General of Alwaleed Philanthropies Princess Lamia bint Majed Al Saud, said: “Adequate housing and proper job placements are vital in economic, social, and civic development. If addressed properly, a myriad of socio-economic benefits can be reaped and business opportunities will grow.”

She added: “Today’s agreements with the SDRPY, UN-Habitat and Education for Employment demonstrate our continuous efforts towards providing long-term solutions and achieving sustainable impact in a way that supports the most vulnerable segments of society. We are delighted to have partnered with institutions that share both our core values and ethos for creating real change within societies.”

Founded in 1980, Alwaleed Philanthropies has spent more than $4 billion in support of more than 1000 social initiatives in nearly 190 countries.