Houthi law is discriminatory: Yemen’s Information minister

The law states that everyone should pay 20 percent of whatever they have to the Houthis. (File/AFP)
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Updated 09 June 2020

Houthi law is discriminatory: Yemen’s Information minister

  • The law states that everyone should pay 20 percent of whatever they have to the Houthis
  • The minister said all nationals needed to recognize “the danger of the Houthis”

DUBAI: Information Minister Muammar Al-Iryani said the Houthi law known as Al-Khums, is racist, Yemen’s state news agency Saba new reported.
The law states that everyone should pay 20 percent of whatever goods they have or obtain, on land or sea, to the Houthis for being “Bani Hashim.”
“Iran’s mercenaries did not just rob the treasury, cash reserves and general revenues, but have also imposed racist laws to continue stealing the nation’s resources and citizens’ wealth,” Al-Iryani said.
“The militants are imposing such laws without popular support or a legal ground to exist… what would they do if they ruled Yemen?” he added.
The minister said all nationals needed to recognize “the danger of the Houthis,” who have built an ideology based on “God’s choice and race supremacy” which he said was discriminatory.


Egyptian churches open doors to visitors

Egyptian army soldier stands guard in front of Saint Joseph's Roman Catholic Church in Cairo, Egypt December 31, 2017. (REUTERS)
Updated 32 min 34 sec ago

Egyptian churches open doors to visitors

  • The regulations for the gradual return of Friday prayers will only be announced after they are discussed by the Council of Ministers.

CAIRO: Coptic Orthodox churches in Egypt are accepting visitors after a four-month closure to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The decision to shut the churches came during a Standing Committee meeting with the Holy Synod headed by Pope Tawadros on March 21.
The reopening on Aug. 3 coincides with the birthday of the late Pope Shenouda III.
Churches in Cairo and Alexandria accepted worshippers for prayers, while those in cities where the outbreak was limited, such as Luxor, reopened in June. Churches have taken steps to ensure the safety of visitors and staff, including regular cleaning and monitoring of visitors’ health and adherence to guidelines.
When visitors enter churches, body temperatures are checked and there is a disinfection process. Shoes are cleaned with a piece of chlorine-soaked cloth and ethyl alcohol is used to wash hands. Each visitor must bring their own handkerchief. All worshippers must wear face masks and maintain safe distances from one another.
The Egyptian Ministry of Awqaf said the regulations for the gradual return of Friday prayers will only be announced after they are discussed by the Council of Ministers.
In a bid to stop the spread of misinformation surrounding the plans, the ministry said the only accurate source of official information is through its website.
The ministry denied rumors that precautionary measures would include cutting the length of Friday sermons to 10 minutes.
Abdullah Hassan, spokesman for the Ministry of Awqaf, said that no official announcement on the return of Friday prayers has been made.
Hassan added that there have been several meetings on the issue of Friday prayers. The findings will be presented to the coronavirus crisis management committee following the Eid Al-Adha holiday.
Hassan urged Egyptian media outlets to ensure the accuracy and truthfulness of news. He added that people should report individuals who makes false claims.