G20 aims to increase global resilience through infrastructure

The InfraTech agenda will provide policy guidance for states to accelerate the implementation of technology in infrastructure. (SPA)
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Updated 10 June 2020

G20 aims to increase global resilience through infrastructure

  • The group aims to create favorable conditions for innovation in infrastructure
  • Saudi aims to cooperate with partners and private sector investors to close infrastructure financing gaps

DUBAI: Representatives of the G20 held a virtual meeting on Wednesday to discuss infrastructure technology, infraTech, Saudi state news agency SPA reported.
The group also discussed a draft report on the collaboration with institutional investors and asset managers to be presented at the next Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors (FMCBG) meeting in July.
The InfraTech agenda will provide policy guidance for states to accelerate the implementation of technology in infrastructure. The G20 Infrastructure Working Group (IWG), aims to remove barriers, manage risks and create favorable conditions for innovation in infrastructure, which would result in stable and long-term economic growth.
The head of Saudi IWG Rakan bin Dahish said they aim to cooperate with partners and private sector investors to close infrastructure financing gaps.
“Over 100 investors with more than $20 trillion of assets under management across a wide geographical coverage have participated in the G20 collaboration with the private sector and delivered input and feedback for the report, which reflects an extensive outreach effort and a high level of investor interest,” head of Saudi IWG Rakan bin Dahish said.


UK PM says schools must open in September

Updated 09 August 2020

UK PM says schools must open in September

  • A study has warned that Britain risks a second wave of COVID-19 this winter if schools open without an improved test-and-trace system
  • The government wants all pupils to return to school by early September

LONDON: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said reopening schools in September was a social, economic and moral imperative and insisted they would be able to operate safely despite the ongoing threat from the pandemic.
His comments follow a study earlier this month which warned that Britain risks a second wave of COVID-19 this winter twice as large as the initial outbreak if schools open without an improved test-and-trace system.
Writing in the Mail on Sunday, Johnson said restarting schools was a national priority. Schools would be the last places to close in future local lockdowns, he was quoted by another newspaper as telling a meeting on Thursday.
Schools in England closed in March during a national lockdown, except for the children of key workers, and reopened in June for a small number of pupils.
The government wants all pupils to return to school by early September in what Johnson has called a “national priority.”
“Keeping our schools closed a moment longer than absolutely necessary is socially intolerable, economically unsustainable and morally indefensible,” Johnson wrote.
The economic costs for parents who cannot work if schools are shut are spiralling, and the country faces big problems if children miss out on education, the prime minister warned.
“This pandemic isn’t over, and the last thing any of us can afford to do is become complacent. But now that we know enough to reopen schools to all pupils safely, we have a moral duty to do so,” he wrote.
The Sunday Times newspaper reported that he has ordered a public relations campaign to ensure schools open on time and told the meeting last week that they should be the last places to close behind restaurants, pubs and shops.