Queen Elizabeth’s official birthday marked with smaller ceremony

Queen Elizabeth’s official birthday marked with smaller ceremony
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Britain's Queen Elizabeth attends a ceremony to mark her official birthday at Windsor Castle in Windsor, Britain, June 13, 2020. (Reuters)
Queen Elizabeth’s official birthday marked with smaller ceremony
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Britain's Queen Elizabeth attends a ceremony to mark her official birthday at Windsor Castle in Windsor, Britain, June 13, 2020. (Reuters)
Queen Elizabeth’s official birthday marked with smaller ceremony
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A member of the Household Division arrives in preparation for a ceremony to mark Britain's Queen Elizabeth's official birthday at Windsor Castle in Windsor, Britain, June 13, 2020. (Reuters)
Queen Elizabeth’s official birthday marked with smaller ceremony
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Britain's Queen Elizabeth attends a ceremony to mark her official birthday at Windsor Castle in Windsor, Britain, June 13, 2020. (Reuters)
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Updated 13 June 2020

Queen Elizabeth’s official birthday marked with smaller ceremony

Queen Elizabeth’s official birthday marked with smaller ceremony
  • This year, a small number of soldiers and military musicians will pay tribute to the monarch at Windsor Castle
  • The queen will receive a royal salute, which will be followed by military drills

LONDON: Queen Elizabeth II’s birthday is being marked Saturday with a smaller ceremony than usual, as the annual Trooping the Color parade is canceled amid the coronavirus pandemic.
The extravagant display of pomp and pageantry, a highlight of the royal calendar that typically attracts thousands of tourists to line the streets of central London, has only been canceled once before during almost 70 years of the queen’s reign — in 1955, during a national rail strike.
This year, a small number of soldiers and military musicians will pay tribute to the monarch at Windsor Castle. The queen will receive a royal salute, which will be followed by military drills. Soldiers will march on the castle grounds in accordance with social distancing rules.
The queen celebrated her 94th birthday on April 21, but her “official” birthday has always been marked with the Trooping the Color parade in June. The ‘colors’ refer to the flags representing the different regiments of the British Army.
The event usually features hundreds of parading soldiers and horses, a carriage procession by the royal family, and a Royal Air Force flypast over Buckingham Palace.


Russia’s second coronavirus vaccine ‘100% effective’, watchdog tells media

Russia’s second coronavirus vaccine ‘100% effective’, watchdog tells media
Updated 19 January 2021

Russia’s second coronavirus vaccine ‘100% effective’, watchdog tells media

Russia’s second coronavirus vaccine ‘100% effective’, watchdog tells media
  • ‘The effectiveness of the vaccine is made up of its immunological effectiveness and preventative effectiveness’

MOSCOW: A candidate COVID-19 vaccine known as EpiVacCorona, Russia’s second to be registered, proved “100 percent effective” in early-stage trials, Russian consumer health watchdog Rospotrebnadzor has told local media.
The data, based on Phase I and II trials, were released before the start of a larger Phase III trial which would normally involve thousands of participants and a placebo group as a comparison.
“The effectiveness of the vaccine is made up of its immunological effectiveness and preventative effectiveness,” the TASS news agency reported, citing Rospotrebnadzor.
“According to results of the first and second phases of clinical trials, the immunological effectiveness of the EpiVacCorona vaccine is 100 percent.”
The Phase I and II studies tested the safety, reactogenicity and immunogenicity of the potential vaccine in 100 people aged 18-60, according to the state trials register.
Russia began testing EpiVacCorona, which is being developed by Siberia’s Vector Institute, in November.
Earlier that month, Moscow said its other approved vaccine, Sputnik V, was 92 percent effective at protecting people from COVID-19 based on interim results.
Russia has said it can inoculate 60 percent of its population against COVID-19 this year, and although the Sputnik V vaccine has been readily available in Moscow, the rollout across the country has been slow.
Russian President Vladimir Putin has ordered mass vaccinations to start this week.
EpiVacCorona will be used in mass vaccinations from March, Deputy Prime Minister Tatiana Golikova told the Interfax news agency.
Russia has reported 3,612,800 coronavirus cases, the world’s fourth-highest total. Its death toll from the virus stands at 66,623.