UAE citizens can travel to ‘low-risk’ countries from Tuesday

Chairs at the Passports Department are set up to adhere to social distancing as civil servants return to work following the easing of restrictions in Dubai on 16 June, 2020. (AFP)
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Updated 18 June 2020

UAE citizens can travel to ‘low-risk’ countries from Tuesday

  • Prospective travelers must test negative for COVID-19 and must quarantine on their return to the UAE for up to 14 days

CAIRO: The United Arab Emirates said citizens and residents will be allowed to travel to countries deemed low-risk for catching the coronavirus from next Tuesday.
Prospective travelers must test negative for COVID-19 and must quarantine on their return to the UAE for up to 14 days, Saif Al Dhaheri, spokesman for the National Emergency Crisis and Disaster Management Authority, told reporters.

Airport authorities will check travelers for symptoms. Those with a fever or showing respiratory problems will be isolated and barred from travel, he said.
Dhaheri did not give a list of countries for each risk category, but said all travel to high-risk countries would remain banned.
Travel to medium-risk countries would be allowed on a case-by-case basis, for people seeking health treatment, visiting immediate family or those on military, diplomatic or official business.


Whole of Iran on coronavirus red alert due to rise in deaths: Health official

Updated 10 min 54 sec ago

Whole of Iran on coronavirus red alert due to rise in deaths: Health official

TEHRAN: A senior Iranian health official has declared a coronavirus red alert covering the entire country as daily deaths and cases increase at an alarming rate, Iranian state TV reported on Friday.
Iran, one of the Middle Eastern countries hardest hit by the pandemic, has been divided up into white, orange/yellow and red regions based on the number of infections and deaths.
The death toll rose by 144 to 23,952 on Friday, while the total number of identified cases spiked by 3,049 to 416,198, health ministry spokeswoman Sima Sadat Lari said on television.
“The color classification doesn’t make sense anymore. We no longer have orange and yellow. The entire country is red,” deputy health minister Iraj Harirchi said on television.
“If the current course continues, the death toll will reach 45,000,” he added, without giving a time frame.
In the northwestern city of Tabriz, for instance, the number of hospitalized patients had jumped from under 40 a day to 160, and in the Shi’ite Muslim holy city of Qom it had increased from 10 a day to 160, Harirchi said, again without providing a time period for the increases.
He said only a 95% use of masks and a 50% fall in gatherings could reduce the death toll.