Paris-Orly airport reopens after 3-month coronavirus closure

The tail fin of a Air caraibes passenger Airbus A350 aircraft is seen near the control tower at Orly Airport before for its re-opening following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in France, June 24, 2020. (Reuters)
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Updated 26 June 2020

Paris-Orly airport reopens after 3-month coronavirus closure

  • On Friday, officials expect around 8,000 passengers, less than 10 percent of the daily pre-virus average of around 90,000
  • A plane operated by low-cost carrier Transavia took off at 04:25 GMT for Porto in Portugal, marking the first commercial flight since the airport south of Paris came to a halt on March 31

ORLY: France: Orly airport serving the French capital Paris reopened on Friday for the first time in nearly three months after air travel collapsed during the coronavirus pandemic but flights will be a fraction of the normal rate.
A plane operated by low-cost carrier Transavia took off at 6:25 am (0425 GMT) for Porto in Portugal, marking the first commercial flight since the airport south of Paris came to a halt on March 31.
Firefighters hosed the plane with a festive “water salute” before it took to the runway.
Airlines including Transavia, Air France, easyJet, Vueling and Air Caraibes account for most of the traffic at Orly, flying to the Caribbean, Reunion Island, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Iceland and Croatia, among others.
On Friday, officials expect around 8,000 passengers, less than 10 percent of the daily pre-virus average of around 90,000.
They will be on more than 70 flights compared to the normal run of 600 per day.
Traffic is due to increase to 173 flights per day in July but it will depend much on whether Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia reopen their borders as well as on whether the virus remains under control.
For nearly three months, all commercial flights from Paris have taken off from the main Charles de Gaulle airport, to the north of the capital, in order to rationalize costs.
To regain the trust of passengers, the airport has taken measures to check the spread of the coronavirus.
Put in place are more than 7,000 posters and stickers to keep people at a safe distance, distributers of hand sanitizer and plexiglass windows at check-in desks and other counters to minimize contact.
Thermal cameras are being used to check the temperatures of passengers.


US to pay over $1bn for 100m doses of J&J’s potential COVID-19 vaccine

Updated 5 min 56 sec ago

US to pay over $1bn for 100m doses of J&J’s potential COVID-19 vaccine

  • The latest contract equates to roughly $10 per vaccine dose produced by J&J
  • This is J&J’s first deal to supply its investigational vaccine to a country

WASHINGTON: The United States government will pay Johnson & Johnson over $1 billion for 100 million doses of its potential coronavirus vaccine, its latest such arrangement as the race to tame the pandemic intensifies, the drugmaker said on Wednesday.
It said it would deliver the vaccine to the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) on a not-for-profit basis to be used after approval or emergency use authorization by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
J&J has already received $1 billion in funding from the US government — BARDA agreed in March to provide that money for the company to build manufacturing capacity for more than 1 billion doses of the experimental vaccine.
The latest contract equates to roughly $10 per vaccine dose produced by J&J. Including the first $1 billion deal with the USgovernment, the price would be slightly higher than the $19.50 per dose that the United States is paying for the vaccine being developed by Pfizer Inc. and German biotech BioNTech SE.
The US government may also purchase an additional 200 million doses under a subsequent agreement. J&J did not disclose that deal’s value.
J&J plans to study a one- or two-dose regimen of the vaccine in parallel later this year. A single-shot regimen could allow more people to be vaccinated with the same number of doses and would sidestep issues around getting people to come back for their second dose.
This is J&J’s first deal to supply its investigational vaccine to a country. Talks are underway with the European Union, but no deal has yet been reached.
J&J’s investigational vaccine is currently being tested on healthy volunteers in the United States and Belgium in an early-stage study.
There are currently no approved vaccines for COVID-19. More than 20 are in clinical trials.