Chinese factories face headwinds in post-lockdown recovery

Chinese factories could struggle to keep up momentum as pent-up demand wanes and exports struggle. (AFP)
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Updated 09 July 2020

Chinese factories face headwinds in post-lockdown recovery

  • China’s passenger car retail sales fell 8 percent in June from a year earlier

BEIJING: Orders for infrastructure materials and equipment have helped industrial output recover faster in China than most places emerging from COVID-19 lockdowns, but further expansion will be hard to attain without stronger broad-based demand and exports.

Prices of copper and steel have surged and share prices for Chinese blue chips struck five-year highs, as state-funded infrastructure projects drove up production of cement, steel and non-ferrous metals.

Railway investment, for example, soared 11.4 percent in April-June from a year earlier versus a 21 percent drop in the first quarter.

Industries gained from pent-up demand for autos and electronics. The property sector, a pillar of growth, also showed signs of rebounding, with real estate investment expanding and sales quickening.

China’s factory-gate prices, still in deflation territory this year, may have turned positive on a monthly basis in June, said Yating Xu, senior economist at IHS Markit, in a sign of recovering demand for manufactured goods.

The optimism also led investment bank ING to forecast no more policy interest rate cuts from the central bank for the rest of the year. “We started to return to thin profit in May and became a bit better in June,” said an official at a state-owned steel mill in central China, declining to be named due to company policy.

“Our demand mainly comes from infrastructure so far this year, especially for steel rebar and medium plates,” he said. Steel rebars are mostly used in construction, and medium steel plates in ships and excavators.

Underpinned by robust infrastructure demand from China, the Baltic dry index, which tracks rates for ships ferrying dry bulk commodities and reflects rates for capesize, surged 257 percent in June from a low struck in May due to the freeze in global trade as a result of the lockdowns.

The rosy outlook stands in stark contrast to the dismal industrial landscapes of other economies still fighting COVID-19. Factory output plunged further in May from a year earlier in Japan, South Korea and the US. Euro zone manufacturing output fell by a record 28 percent in April.

The industrial recovery is expected to help China’s economy post a positive growth rate in the second quarter after contracting for the first time in decades due to COVID-19.

But analysts warn that factories could struggle to keep up momentum even as early as this quarter as pent-up demand wanes, exports struggle and heavy floods take their toll on industries and businesses in the Yangtze Delta.

The surge in demand for automobiles has been released and the auto market entered a traditional lull in June, said the China Passenger Car Association (CPCA) last week. China’s passenger car retail sales fell 8 percent in June from a year earlier.

In May auto sales rose for the first time after a two-year slump, fanning expectations of a strong V-shaped recovery in a pillar industry, supporting the broader economy. Auto deliveries to dealers also rose for the second straight month in May.

Exports, a sector that provides about 200 million urban jobs, are forecast to come under pressure in the third quarter, analysts say, as sales of COVID-19-related medical supplies slow and global demand stays soft.


Turkey on brink of recession as economy collapses

Updated 13 August 2020

Turkey on brink of recession as economy collapses

  • Consumer debt has increased by 25 percent to more than $100 billion in the past three months

JEDDAH: President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s popularity is plunging in lockstep with Turkey’s collapsing economy and the country is on the verge of a potentially devastating recession, financial experts have told Arab News.
The value of the Turkish lira has fallen to 7.30 against the US dollar and the central bank has spent $65 billion to prop up the currency, according to the US investment bank Goldman Sachs.
Consumer debt has increased by 25 percent to more than $100 billion in the past three months as the government moved to help families during the coronavirus pandemic, but the result has been a surge in inflation to 12 percent.
With the falling lira and increased price of imported goods, the living standards of many Turks who earn in lira but have dollar debts have fallen sharply.
The economy is expected to shrink by about 4 percent this year. The official unemployment rate remains at 12.8 percent because layoffs are banned, although many experts say the real figures are far higher.
To complete the perfect storm, tourism revenues and exports have been decimated by the pandemic, and foreign capital has fled amid fears over economic trends and the independence of the central bank.
Wolfango Piccoli, of Teneo Intelligence in London, said logic dictated an increase in interest rates but “this is unlikely to happen.”
Piccoli said central bank officials would strive to avoid an outright rate hike at their monetary policy meeting on Aug. 20. “A mix of controlled devaluation and backdoor policies, such as limiting Turkish lira’s liquidity, remains their preferred approach,” he said.
There is speculation of snap elections, and Erdogan’s view is that higher interest rates cause inflation, despite considerable economic evidence to the contrary.