Liverpool Arab Arts Festival goes digital

Liverpool Arab Arts Festival goes digital
Moroccan group Daraa Tribes will close the festival. (Supplied)
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Updated 09 July 2020

Liverpool Arab Arts Festival goes digital

Liverpool Arab Arts Festival goes digital
  • UK’s longest-running Arab arts fest launches online celebration of Arabic culture from across the world

LONDON: With the repercussions of the COVID-19 pandemic being felt around the world, Liverpool Arab Arts Festival (LAAF) — which has been running annually since 1998 — has, like many other such events, shifted to a digital format for its 2020 program, which will be held from July 9-18.

“We made the decision in March to switch to a digital festival,” explains LAAF director Anne Thwaite. “We had the luxury of time to plan and prepare, which many of our peers didn’t. Our funders, including Arts Council England, Liverpool City Council, and our community and education project funders, were supportive of a digital event this year.”




Moroccan musical collective N3rdistan Walead Ben Selim and Widad Brocos will kick off the festival. (Supplied)

The festival program was, Thwaite admits, 95 percent complete back in March. And while some of those events won’t now be held — especially those requiring gatherings — the switch to online has also created opportunities that didn’t exist before.

“As an example, we had approached (Yemen-based British writer) Tim Mackintosh-Smith about an event and he couldn’t make it to Liverpool,” says Thwaite. “When we decided to move forward with a digital festival, we approached him again and could organize a digital reading and conversation.

“We’ve been able to connect artists we might not have done,” Thwaite continues. “We’ve been able to work with artists to develop their work on a digital platform which has brought a new element of creativity. This has been a strange time for everyone in the world. There has been real comfort to be able to spend much of that time creatively, forging new partnerships and strengthening old ones.”




Curfew, performed by El-Funoun PDT and Hawiyya Dance Company. (Supplied)

Rather than physically attending the festival, audiences are able to sign up for some events via LAAF’s website, and will be sent a link to film screenings, Zoom conversations or performances, while music events will take place live on Facebook.

“When we’re in physical venues, we spend a great deal of time matching artists and events to specific venues,” explains Thwaite. “We’ve very consciously done the same thing for this digital festival. It isn’t as simple as just broadcasting everything via Facebook or Instagram Live. Some events will benefit from a closed Zoom group that has a sense of intimacy. Others, it’ll feel like a kitchen disco where you crank the speakers and dance to the music. What’s been interesting is how many of our followers and friends in the Arab world have been delighted they will be able to ‘attend’ this year.”

The festival launches on July 9 with members of Moroccan musical collective N3rdistan Walead Ben Selim and Widad Brocos, kicking off a program that boasts influential thinkers and performers from across the Arab world. Highlights include performances from poet and artist-in-residence Lisa Luxx, Moroccan group Daraa Tribes (who will close the festival), Syrian electronic musician and producer Hello Psychaleppo, screenings of Arab films from across the diaspora (including “Mawlana”, “Jaddoland” and the BBC Arabic Festival, which will showcase female directors), and conversations and panels covering everything from creative writing and safeguarding national literature to the challenges facing those writing about Palestine.




Only Silence, Katia Jarjoura, 2017. (Supplied)

LAAF will ask for donations linked to tickets, with all proceeds going to artists and commissioning new work for the festival in 2021.

“We are passionate that not only should everyone have access to the arts, but that everyone should have access to being an artist,” says Thwaite. “Creating thoughtful, heartfelt, detailed work takes time, energy and passion. (Each) of those things — especially time — takes money. Artists often don’t get paid for that valuable time just spent thinking about their work. It has never been more important for us to empower artists and to ensure that, wherever they are from and whatever their story is, they have the agency and the ability to tell it and share it.”

This digital format will, Thwaite explains, also be key to the festival’s future editions.

“We would probably struggle not to have a digital aspect from now on. There are artists and performers we physically cannot bring to Liverpool, either because of travel or resources. Digital technology enables us to join a live gig in Aleppo and broadcast it to our followers. A digital program helps those who can’t come to Liverpool connect with the festival in a new way, and feel part of it in a way they haven’t before.”


Saudi tenor Marwan Fagi kicks off Abu Dhabi Festival’s Ramadan series

Saudi tenor Marwan Fagi kicks off Abu Dhabi Festival’s Ramadan series
Updated 21 April 2021

Saudi tenor Marwan Fagi kicks off Abu Dhabi Festival’s Ramadan series

Saudi tenor Marwan Fagi kicks off Abu Dhabi Festival’s Ramadan series

DUBAI: The 18th edition of the Abu Dhabi Festival (ADF), themed “The Future Starts Now,” kicked off on Tuesday, and to celebrate the launch of its Ramadan series, Saudi singer Marwan Fagi opened up the event with a virtual performance. 

The singer, who hails from Makkah, performed “Ateehu Fika” (Lost in You), a song he composed based on a poem by Lebanese poet Nada El-Hage, with music by Saudi musician Rami Basahih.

Composer, soprano and academic Hiba Al-Kawas produced and conducted the show and mentored Fagi, weaving together the singer’s natural high tones and soothing low tones. 

Fagi was accompanied by members of the Lebanese Philharmonic Orchestra. The performance was streamed online on ADF’s digital platforms.

Members of the orchestra recorded the melody in the National Museum of Lebanon in Beirut, while Fagi recorded his voice in Al-Tayebat International City of Science and Knowledge, an Islamic heritage museum in Jeddah.

Fagi said in a released statement: “Being part of Abu Dhabi Festival is a great opportunity for me, given its cultural status on local, regional and global levels and its unique multicultural message of acceptance and openness, which positively serves the music industry in the Arab world. My current experience with ADF is unique and special because it is liberating from all traditional musical restrictions.”

The Ramadan series, titled “Human Fraternity: Dignity and Hope,” includes digital performances of over 25 songs and chants by Arab vocalists and creators, written by 11 poets and writers and performed by eight chanters and singers who are accompanied by 60 musicians.


‘Promising Young Woman:’ A mesmeric, Oscar-tipped performance by Carey Mulligan

‘Promising Young Woman:’ A mesmeric, Oscar-tipped performance by Carey Mulligan
‘Promising Young Woman’ has been nominated for a number of Oscars. Supplied
Updated 21 April 2021

‘Promising Young Woman:’ A mesmeric, Oscar-tipped performance by Carey Mulligan

‘Promising Young Woman:’ A mesmeric, Oscar-tipped performance by Carey Mulligan

CHENNAI: Director Emerald Fennell’s debut feature “Promising Young Woman” is in the Academy Awards race in a multitude of categories, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress and Best Original Screenplay. Penned by Fennell herself, it is Carey Mulligan’s work all the way, and she gives an Oscar-worthy performance as Ohio-based Cassandra Thomas.

A medical school dropout, Cassandra is 30 with no boyfriend and no real friends, much to the anxiety of her doting parents. Of course, there is a reason for this. Years ago, her med-school classmate. Al Monroe (Chris Lowell), sexually assaulted her best friend, Nina Fisher. A corrupt lawyer and the school’s uncaring administration let Monroe off and left him not feeling the faintest sense of remorse. Cassandra, a promising student, dropped out and withdrew from social life.

Against this backdrop, which is gradually revealed in the nearly two-hour movie, we watch Cassandra make a weekly trip to a bar until a “friendly” male attempts to take advantage of her inebriated state, before she reveals she is in perfect control of her faculties, having pretended to be tipsy to lull predators into a false sense of security.

The plot is extremely gripping. We watch with trepidation as Cassandra challenges men, who on the surface seem so jovial, friendly and highbrow — the ultimate “nice guys” — until the moment of reckoning, when they fail to do the right thing.

Director Emerald Fennell’s debut feature “Promising Young Woman” is in the Academy Awards race in a multitude of categories. Supplied

Cassandra’s life of solitude is upended, however, when she re-connects with Ryan Cooper (Bo Burnham), an old classmate who finds a chink in her armor. The pair does have genuine chemistry — enough for a whole film on them.

“Promising Young Woman” is not about their romance, however. It is about Cassandra, it is about Mulligan, and audiences will be amazed to see her comic side in a film on such dark subject matter — it is a mesmeric performance.

The soundtrack is moody and meaningful — songs like “It’s Rainin’ Men” and Britney Spears’ “Toxic,” fill the air, as well as Paris Hilton’s cheery pop numbers that are foot-tapping but jarring.


UK actress Jameela Jamil to host 2021 Webby Awards

UK actress Jameela Jamil to host 2021 Webby Awards
Updated 21 April 2021

UK actress Jameela Jamil to host 2021 Webby Awards

UK actress Jameela Jamil to host 2021 Webby Awards

DUBAI: British actress Jameela Jamil, who is of Indian-Pakistani decent, is set to host the 25th edition of the Webby Awards, organizers announced this week. 

The event will be held virtually and winners will be announced on May 18. 

South Korean band BTS, US singer-songwriter Billie Eilish and rapper Cardi B are among a long list of nominees for the 2021 Webby Awards. 

The nominations also include Trevor Noah, Jennifer Garner, Kevin Bacon, Shaquille O'Neal, Rob Gronkowski, Ryan Reynolds, Martin Lawrence, James Corden, LeBron James, Stephen Colbert, Chris Evans, John Mayer and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. 

The awards show, which was founded in 1996, celebrates excellence on the Internet, including websites, media and public relations, advertising, video, apps, mobile and voice, social, podcasts and games.


From Cairo to Barcelona, jewelry guru reflects on his family’s almost 100-year-old label

From Cairo to Barcelona, jewelry guru reflects on his family’s almost 100-year-old label
Updated 21 April 2021

From Cairo to Barcelona, jewelry guru reflects on his family’s almost 100-year-old label

From Cairo to Barcelona, jewelry guru reflects on his family’s almost 100-year-old label

DUBAI: A Cairo-born jewelry brand that has been running since 1923 must have quite a story to tell, with plenty of insight for up-and-coming designers to learn from.

Egyptian label El Baz Jewelry is a family business that has been on the market for almost a century, fueled by its evolving artistic vision and mastery of the complex art of jewelry making. 

Youssef El-Baz, one of the owners of the brand, spoke with Arab News about how jewelry design in the region has changed over the past 100 years and why he believes El Baz has endured, as well as the launch of his own brands, one of which he kickstarted in Barcelona. 

“In the past, people were keen on buying jewelry that… was chosen based on the material and the resale value, with little attention to the design,” said El-Baz.

“Today… the customers who want to buy jewelry are (more interested in) the design (rather) than the material,” he added.

However, the designer, who founded two other labels – Grace Jewelry and B Jewelry – believes some things in the industry will never change. 

“I believe what will never change about jewelry is the sentimental value it holds, like inheritance and the idea of passing on jewelry through generations,” he said.  “People hold their loved ones forever (by) wearing and keeping their (designs).”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Grace. (@graceyourjewelry)

When it comes to the brand’s longevity, El-Baz shared his thoughts on why the label has lasted.

“In jewelry, people are always looking for authenticity or people are always looking for high quality, because they are buying something precious … and taste for sure. If the brand is not developing and adapting to the different tastes that change during the years it will die out,” explained El-Baz.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Grace. (@graceyourjewelry)

On that note, in 2019, El-Baz launched his own brand, B Jewelry, during a spell in Barcelona and quickly followed it up with the launch of Grace Jewelry in 2020.

“I wanted to create a jewelry brand that was socially responsible. I felt like Grace can be the beginning of a change in an industry where people start brands that are environmentally aware through their designs, manufacturing and packaging.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by B Jewelry (@bjewelryworld)

El-Baz got the inspiration to open the Cairo-based label Grace when he was in Milan.

“We have a complete collection called For A Better Tomorrow, (where) every design is dedicated toward a good cause. We donate 10 percent of the sales toward a good cause.” 

El-Baz ships worldwide for all three brands. 


Netflix working on film about Syrian refugees-turned-sports stars Sarah, Yusra Mardini

Netflix working on film about Syrian refugees-turned-sports stars Sarah, Yusra Mardini
Syrian refugees and swimmers Yusra and Sarah Mardini pose for photographers with the trophy at the Bambi awards on Nov 17, 2016 in Berlin. AFP
Updated 21 April 2021

Netflix working on film about Syrian refugees-turned-sports stars Sarah, Yusra Mardini

Netflix working on film about Syrian refugees-turned-sports stars Sarah, Yusra Mardini

DUBAI: Netflix has announced that it has teamed up with Egyptian-Welsh director and screenwriter Sally El-Hosaini on a new film titled “The Swimmers,” based on the true story of Syrian refugees-turned-Olympians Sarah and Yusra Mardini.

The film tells the story of the two sisters and competitive swimmers and their miraculous journey as refugees from war-torn Syria to the 2016 Rio Olympics, where Yusra competed as a swimmer as part of the Refugee Olympic Athletes (ROT).

Lebanese actresses, and real-life sisters, Manal and Nathalie Issa will portray Yusra and Sarah Mardini in the upcoming movie.

They will be joined by Arab-Israeli actor Ali Suliman, Egyptian actor Ahmed Malek, Syrian actress Kinda Alloush and “The Good Karma Hospital” star James Krishna Floyd, who starred in El-Hosaini’s last film “My Brother the Devil,” which won the World Cinema Cinematography at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival.  

Rounding out the cast are German actor Matthias Schweighöfer and YouTube star Elmi Rashid Elmi.

The forthcoming film will be produced by Working Title’s Eric and Tim Bevan, Ali Jaafar and Tim Cole. Stephen Daldry is the executive producer.

“The Swimmers” is set to begin production this week, shooting in the UK, Turkey and Belgium.

It is slated for global release on Netflix in 2022.