What We Are Reading Today: Big Friendship

Short Url
Updated 11 July 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Big Friendship

Authors: Aminatou Sow and Ann Friedman

A close friendship is one of the most influential and important relationships a human life can contain. But for all the rosy sentiments surrounding friendship, most people don’t talk much about what it really takes to stay close for the long haul.
Two friends, Aminatou Sow and Ann Friedman, tell the story of their equally messy and life-affirming Big Friendship in this honest and hilarious book that chronicles their first decade in one another’s lives.
As the hosts of the hit podcast Call Your Girlfriend, they have become known for frank and intimate conversations. In this book, they bring that energy to their own friendship— its joys and its pitfalls.
“An inspiring and entertaining testament to the power of society’s most under-appreciated relationship, Big Friendship will invite you to think about how your own bonds are formed, challenged, and preserved,” said a review in goodreads.com.
“It is a call to value your friendships in all of their complexity. Actively choose them. And, sometimes, fight for them,” it added. 


What We Are Reading Today: Introduction to Social Neuroscience

Updated 12 August 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Introduction to Social Neuroscience

Edited by Stephanie Cacioppo and John T. Cacioppo

Humans, like many other animals, are a highly social species. But how do our biological systems implement social behaviors, and how do these processes shape the brain and biology? Spanning multiple disciplines, Introduction to Social Neuroscience seeks to engage students and scholars alike in exploring the effects of the brain’s perceived connections with others. 

This wide-ranging textbook provides a quintessential foundation for comprehending the psychological, neural, hormonal, cellular, and genomic mechanisms underlying such varied social processes as loneliness, empathy, theory-of-mind, trust, and cooperation.

Stephanie and John Cacioppo posit that our brain is our main social organ. They show how the same objective relationship can be perceived as friendly or threatening depending on the mental states of the individuals involved in that relationship. They present exercises and evidence-based findings readers can put into practice to better understand the neural roots of the social brain and the cognitive and health implications of a dysfunctional social brain. 

This textbook’s distinctive features include the integration of human and animal studies, clinical cases from medicine, multilevel analyses of topics from genes to societies, and a variety of methodologies.