Tunisia PM Elyes Fakhfakh resigns

Tunisia PM Elyes Fakhfakh resigns
Tunisian Prime Minister Elyes Fakhfakh resigned on Wednesday, according to two official sources who did not want to be named, after a row with the Islamist-inspired Ennahdha party. (AFP)
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Updated 15 July 2020

Tunisia PM Elyes Fakhfakh resigns

Tunisia PM Elyes Fakhfakh resigns
  • Fakhfakh has had strained relations with Ennahdha, the biggest party in parliament

TUNIS: Tunisian Prime Minister Elyes Fakhfakh resigned on Wednesday, according to two official sources who did not want to be named, after a row with the Islamist-inspired Ennahdha party.
Fakhfakh, who is under investigation over allegations of conflict of interest, has had strained relations with Ennahdha, the biggest party in parliament, since October legislative elections.
Ennahdha had earlier Wednesday tabled a no-confidence motion against Fakhfakh, who took office in February after winning approval from lawmakers following four months of deadlock.
Ennahdha came top in the October polls but fell far short of a majority and eventually agreed to join a coalition government.
The party initially nominated an independent for premier but he failed to win the support of parliament, leading President Kais Saied to name former finance minister Fakhfakh for the post.
Fakhfakh is under investigation over alleged failure to hand over control of shares he owns in private companies that have won public contracts.


Pentagon includes Israel in Middle East command area

Pentagon includes Israel in Middle East command area
Updated 15 January 2021

Pentagon includes Israel in Middle East command area

Pentagon includes Israel in Middle East command area
  • Moving Israel under the Central Command potentially makes security cooperation with the US on regional matters easier
  • The move could bring Israeli military officials in closer proximity to those of Gulf neighbors

WASHINGTON: The US Defense Department announced Friday that it would include close ally Israel in the area covered by its Middle East-focused Central Command.
In another sign of the rapprochement brokered by President Donald Trump between Israel and Arab countries, the Pentagon said US military dealings with Israel would no longer be handled by its European Command.
“We structure boundaries to best mitigate risk and protect US interests and partners,” the Pentagon said in a statement.
“The easing of tensions between Israel and its Arab neighbors subsequent to the Abraham Accords has provided a strategic opportunity for the United States to align key partners against shared threats in the Middle East.”
That was mainly a reference to Iran, which the United States, Israel and Arab countries view as the leading security threat to the region.
For decades at odds with its Arab neighbors over its treatment of Palestinians, Israel has over the past year broken barriers on open cooperation and communications with Gulf countries under the Trump-fostered Abraham Accords.
Moving it under the Central Command potentially makes security cooperation with the United States on regional matters easier, and could bring Israeli military officials in closer proximity to those of Gulf neighbors.
But it could also complicate CentCom cooperation with Iran allies like Iraq, where the US retains 2,500 troops.
“Israel is a leading strategic partner for the United States, and this will open up additional opportunities for cooperation with our US Central Command partners, while maintaining strong cooperation between Israel and our European allies,” the Pentagon said.