Book Review: The Broken Contract: Making Our Democracies Accountable, Representative and Less Wasteful 

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Updated 25 July 2020

Book Review: The Broken Contract: Making Our Democracies Accountable, Representative and Less Wasteful 

Author: Dr. Saqib Iqbal Qureshi 

 

The protests and political turbulence seen around the world in the past two years is in part a reaction against ineffective governance. 

The Broken Contract: Making Our Democracies Accountable, Representative and Less Wasteful by Dr. Saqib Iqbal Qureshi offers several intriguing ideas to deal with the general malaise, which is threatening good governance. 

As he points out, when even the government of North Korea describes itself as “democratic” the term is almost meaningless. Instead, we should focus on improving governance. 

These are well known public policy issues but  Qureshi, who worked at McKinsey, offers new insights and fresh examples, many drawn from Canada where he lives. Qureshi acted as a government consultant and draws on the experience of his long career in suggesting ways that governance can be improved. Rather than making workers “employees for life,” bureaucracies should become better human resource managers. 

That means firing under performers and rewarding rising stars. This book offers other helpful advice and is available for pre-order on Amazon. You can’t fight city hall, as the saying goes, but armed with Qureshi’s book we may have a fighting chance.


What We Are Reading Today: Fallout

Updated 08 August 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Fallout

Author: Lesley M. M. Blume

New York Times bestselling author Lesley M.M. Blume reveals how one courageous American reporter uncovered one of the deadliest cover-ups of the 20th century — the true effects of the atom bomb — potentially saving millions of lives.
Released on the 75th anniversary of the Hiroshima bombing, Fallout is an engrossing detective story, as well as an important piece of hidden history that shows how one heroic scoop saved — and can still save — the world.
On the bright clear morning of Aug. 6, 1945, the US dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, immediately killing 70,000 people, and so grievously crushing, burning and irradiating another 50,000 that they too soon died.
Blume, a tireless researcher and beautiful writer, moves through her narrative with seeming effortlessness — a trick that belies the skill and hard labor required to produce such prose.
Knowing what we know today about the nuclear bomb and its devastating consequences, it’s so amazing to read this thoroughly researched report on the man who, against all odds, exposed to the world the true damage of the bomb when it was dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.