What We Are Reading Today: The Indomitable Florence Finch

Short Url
Updated 25 July 2020

What We Are Reading Today: The Indomitable Florence Finch

Author: Robert J. Mrazek

The Indomitable Florence Finch is the story of the transcendent bravery of a woman who belongs in America’s pantheon of war heroes.
Florence Finch, the unsung World War II hero, saved countless American lives in the Philippines.
After the war, she moved to the US, and in 1947 was awarded the Medal of Freedom, the highest honor a civilian can receive, for the way she had risked her life to save American prisoners and perform other acts of resistance. She died in 2016 at the age of 101.
Author Robert J. Mrazek’s “amazing story is of resilience, resistance, the fight to live and to help others and to be free and survive,” said a review published in goodreadas.com.
“Florence was an unlikely warrior. She relied on her own intelligence and fortitude to survive on her own from the age of seven, facing bigotry as a person with the dual heritage of her American serviceman father and Filipino mother,” the review added.
Mrazek is the author of seven novels, including Stonewall’s Gold, Unholy Fire, The Deadly Embrace, Valhalla, The Bone Hunters, Dead Man’s Bridge, and And the Sparrow Fell.


What We Are Reading Today: First: Sandra Day O’Connor by Evan Thomas

Updated 28 September 2020

What We Are Reading Today: First: Sandra Day O’Connor by Evan Thomas

Sandra Day O’Connor’s story is that of a woman who repeatedly shattered glass ceilings — doing so with a blend of grace, wisdom, humor, understatement, and cowgirl toughness.

This is a remarkably vivid and personal portrait of a woman who loved her family and believed in serving her country, who, when she became the most powerful woman in America, built a bridge forward for the women who followed her, according to a review published on goodreads.com.

She was born in 1930 in El Paso and grew up on a cattle ranch in Arizona. At a time when women were expected to be homemakers, she set her sights on Stanford University. When she graduated near the top of her class at law school in 1952, no firm would even interview her.

She became the first-ever female majority leader of a state senate. As a judge on the Arizona State Court of Appeals, she stood up to corrupt lawyers and humanized the law. When she arrived at the Supreme Court, appointed by Reagan in 1981, she began a quarter-century tenure on the court, hearing cases that ultimately shaped American law.