What We Are Reading Today: Wildlife of the Galapagos: Second Edition

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Updated 01 August 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Wildlife of the Galapagos: Second Edition

Authors: Julian Fitter, Daniel Fitter, and David Hosking

Since its first publication more than a decade ago, Wildlife of the Galapagos has become the definitive, classic field guide to the natural splendors of this amazing part of the world.
Now fully updated, this essential and comprehensive guide has been expanded to include the more than 400 commonly seen birds, mammals, reptiles, invertebrates, and plants, and other coastal and marine life of this wondrous archipelago.
Over 650 stunning color photographs, maps, and drawings are accompanied by accessible, descriptive text. This new edition includes information about all the common fish of the region and Spanish names are featured for the first time. There is also a revised section that discusses the islands’ history, climate, geology, and conservation, with the most current details on visitor sites.
This is the perfect portable companion for all nature enthusiasts interested in the astounding Galapagos.
  — Covers 400+ commonly seen species, including birds, mammals, reptiles, invertebrates, and plants, and other coastal and marine life
— Illustrated with over 650 color photographs, maps, and drawings
— Includes maps of visitor sites
 


What We Are Reading Today: After the Last Border

Updated 09 August 2020

What We Are Reading Today: After the Last Border

Author: Jessica Goudreau

After the Last Border — written by Jessica Goudreau — is an intimate look at the lives of two women as they struggle for the 21st century American dream, having won the “golden ticket” to settle as refugees in Austin, Texas.
The book casts a light on the history of the refugee relocation process, and how it has changed throughout the 20th and 21st centuries.
The writer “tracks the human impacts of America’s ever-shifting refugee policy as both women narrowly escape from their home countries and begin the arduous but lifesaving process of resettling in Austin — a city that would show them the best and worst of what America has to offer,” said said a review in goodreads.com.
“These women are so empowering. Their stories can give others a lot of inspiration,” it added.
After the Last Border “offers a crash course in how shifts in public attitudes and, in turn, US policy have helped and hindered people desperate to escape the poverty or violence in their homelands,” Mimi Swartz said in a review for The New York Times.