Iraq’s oil exports average 2.76 mln bpd in July, says ministry

Flames emerge from flare stacks at Nahr Bin Umar oil field, as a man is seen wearing a protective face mask, following the outbreak of the coronavirus, north of Basra, Iraq March 9, 2020. (File/Reuters/Essam Al-Sudani)
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Updated 01 August 2020

Iraq’s oil exports average 2.76 mln bpd in July, says ministry

  • The exports included 2.668 million bpd from its southern Basra oilfields
  • Iraq which relies almost entirely on oil for state revenue has been hit hard by low oil prices during the coronavirus crisis and has cut exports in line with OPEC production cuts

BAGHDAD: Iraq’s total oil exports for July averaged 2.763 million barrels per day (bpd), the oil ministry said in a statement on Saturday.
The exports included 2.668 million bpd from its southern Basra oilfields, it said, adding that total exports generated $3.487 billion of revenue. The oil price per barrel averaged $40.70.
Iraq which relies almost entirely on oil for state revenue has been hit hard by low oil prices during the coronavirus crisis and has cut exports in line with OPEC production cuts.


Thailand finance minister: economy to recover next year with 4% growth

Updated 23 November 2020

Thailand finance minister: economy to recover next year with 4% growth

  • Economy had bottomed but recovery was not fast as the battered tourism sector hurt supply chains
  • Budget for the next fiscal year will still focus on boosting domestic activity

BANGKOK: Thailand’s economy is expected to grow 4 percent in 2021 after a slump this year and fiscal policy will support a tourism-reliant economy struggling from the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic, the finance minister said on Monday.
Southeast Asia’s second-largest economy shrank a less than expected 6.4 percent in the third quarter from a year earlier after falling 12.1 percent in the previous three months.
The economy had bottomed but recovery was not fast as the battered tourism sector, which accounts for about 12 percent of gross domestic product (GDP), has also hurt supply chains, Finance minister Arkhom Termpittayapaisith said.
“Without the COVID, our economy could have expanded 3 percent this year, he said. “As we expect a 6 percent contraction this year, there is the output gap of 9 percent,” he told a business forum.
“Next year, we expect 4 percent growth, which is still not 100 percent yet,” Arkhom said, adding it could take until 2022 to return to pre-pandemic levels.
There is still fiscal policy room to help growth from this year’s fiscal budget and some from rehabilitation spending, he said.
The budget for the next fiscal year will still focus on boosting domestic activity, Arkhom said, and the current public debt of 49 percent of GDP was manageable.
Of the government’s 1 trillion baht ($33 billion) borrowing plan, 400 billion would be for economic revival, of which about 120 billion-130 billion has been approved, Arkhom said.
He wants the Bank of Thailand to take more action short term on the baht, which continued to rise on Monday, despite central bank measures announced on Friday to rein in the currency strength.
“They have done that and they have their measures... which should be introduced gradually and more intensely,” Arkhom said.