EU eyes softening key state aid demand in Brexit talks — sources

Both sides still say they hope to avoid the most economically damaging “no-deal” rupture. (File/AFP)
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Updated 03 August 2020

EU eyes softening key state aid demand in Brexit talks — sources

  • The 27 EU countries have long demanded so-called “level playing field” guarantees from Britain
  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government refuses to be bound by EU state aid rules

BRUSSELS: The European Union is willing to compromise to help break a deadlock in Brexit talks by softening its demand that Britain heed EU rules on state aid in the future, diplomatic sources told Reuters.
They said Brussels could go for a compromise entailing a dispute-settling mechanism on any state aid granted by the UK to its companies in the future, rather than obliging London to follow the bloc’s own rules from the outset.
Provisions to ensure fair competition pose the biggest stumbling block in the troubled talks aimed at sealing a new trade accord from 2021 following Britain’s exit from the EU in January after 46 years of membership.
The 27 EU countries have long demanded so-called “level playing field” guarantees from Britain if it wants to continue selling goods freely in the bloc’s lucrative single market of 450 million people — after Britain’s standstill transition period following Brexit expires at the end of this year.
Without an agreement, trade and financial ties between the world’s fifth largest economy and its biggest trading bloc would collapse overnight, likely spreading havoc among markets, businesses and people.
But Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government refuses to be bound by EU state aid rules, environmental standards or labor laws, saying the essence of Brexit was to let Britain decide alone on its own regulations.
Both sides still say they hope to avoid the most economically damaging “no-deal” rupture.

Dispute-settling mechanism
“The room for compromise lies in something that will let the UK decide on its own since ‘regaining sovereignty’ is such a big Brexit thing,” said a EU diplomat close to the Brexit talks.
“We would reserve the right to decide on any consequences vis-à-vis access to the single market for UK companies as a result.”
Another diplomatic source said such a dispute resolution mechanism could be a way to overcome the impasse.
A third diplomat, also speaking on condition of anonymity, acknowledged the EU was ready to ease its earlier demands that Britain agree to a “dynamic alignment” of its competition rules in the future with the bloc’s own.
The person said, however, Britain would still need to agree with the EU on a broad outline of company subsidies policy — rather than specific laws or cases — to allow the bloc to go for such a fix. EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier has repeatedly urged London to make its future plans on that known to the bloc.
“There must be a solid framework with independent oversight. If they agree to settle on broad rules for granting state aid and to have this independent institution, then we have a deal,” said the diplomat.


Sherpa guide who climbed Everest 10 times cremated in Nepal

Updated 1 min 56 sec ago

Sherpa guide who climbed Everest 10 times cremated in Nepal

  • The body of Ang Rita was cremated Wednesday according to Buddhist rituals two days after he died
  • Hundreds lined up at the monastery to pay their last respects, covering the body with the scarf and flowers
KATMANDU, Nepal: Hundreds of government officials, mountaineers, fellow Sherpa guides and supporters gathered in Nepal on Wednesday to mourn the veteran guide who was the first person to climb Mount Everest 10 times.
The body of Ang Rita was cremated Wednesday according to Buddhist rituals two days after he died. He was 72 and had been ill with liver and brain diseases for months.
The body wrapped in Buddhist flags, flowers and cream scarf was taken on a decorated truck from the Sherpa Monastery in the outskirts of Katmandu to cremation grounds in the heart of the city.
Hundreds lined up at the monastery to pay their last respects, covering the body with the scarf and flowers. Among them was Nepal’s tourism minister Yogesh Bhattarai.
“This is an irreplaceable loss to not just Nepal but also for the entire mountaineering community. He has been the reason for Nepalese mountaineers getting recognition around the world,” said Tika Ram Gurung of the Nepal Mountaineering Association, the umbrella body of Nepalese climbers and guides.
Ang Rita was a national hero known as the “snow leopard” and was among the first Sherpa guides internationally recognized for his mountaineering accomplishments. He struggled with his health and had not climbed since setting the Everest record in 1996.
Several mountaineers have surpassed his record since. Kami Rita, who is not related, has scaled the world’s highest mountain 24 times.
Ang Rita is survived by a daughter and two sons.