Kuwaiti lessor Alafco reaches agreement with Boeing over 737 MAX dispute

Alafco earlier sued Boeing for $336 million over accusations it wrongly refused to return advance payments on a canceled order for 40 of its troubled 737 MAX planes. (Reuters)
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Updated 04 August 2020

Kuwaiti lessor Alafco reaches agreement with Boeing over 737 MAX dispute

  • Kuwaiti lessor will now buy 20 aircraft from Boeing, instead of 40, with new delivery date

DUBAI: Kuwaiti aircraft leasing company Alafco will buy fewer aircraft from Boeing after reaching an agreement to end its legal claim over a canceled 737 MAX order, it said on Tuesday.
Alafco was suing the US planemaker for $336 million over accusations it wrongly refused to return advance payments on a canceled order for 40 of its troubled 737 MAX planes.
The Kuwaiti lessor will now buy 20 aircraft from Boeing, instead of 40, with new delivery dates, it said in a bourse filing.
Additional details of the agreement could not be disclosed due to confidentiality clauses, it said.
Alafco said it was “looking forward to a long-lasting and mutually beneficial relationship with Boeing.”
Alafco and Boeing did not immediately respond to emailed requests for comment.
Boeing suspended deliveries of its narrow-body 737 MAX jet in March last year, when the Federal Aviation Administration grounded the aircraft after the deaths of 346 people in crashes of two 737 MAX planes operated by Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines.
The crisis over the grounding of the once top-selling 737 MAX has cost the US planemaker more than $19 billion, slashed production and hobbled its supply chain, with criminal and congressional investigations still ongoing.
Alafco’s owners include Kuwait Finance House, Gulf Investment Corporation and state airline Kuwait Airways, according to its website.


Nvidia deal for Arm will drive computing power growth, says SoftBank’s CEO

Updated 23 October 2020

Nvidia deal for Arm will drive computing power growth, says SoftBank’s CEO

  • Saudi Arabia's Public Investment Fund (PIF) is an anchor investor in the $100 billion Vision Fund

TOKYO/DUBAI: SoftBank Group Corp. CEO Masayoshi Son said on Thursday the sale of chip designer Arm to Nvidia Corp. will drive growth in computing power, in his first public comments since the $40 billion deal was announced in September.
Son made the comments at a virtual summit about artificial intelligence hosted by Saudi Arabia, an anchor investor in the $100 billion Vision Fund, at which he reiterated his belief that AI would transform society.
The Nvidia deal, part of a series of asset sales by Son, whose group has been shaken by soured investments and the COVID-19 pandemic, has raised concerns it will threaten Arm’s role as a neutral supplier in the industry.
Son is set to speak next week with Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang at SoftBank World, the group’s annual event for customers and suppliers that is being retooled as it focuses on investing.
SoftBank’s growing cash pile is driving speculation about future investment plans, with the Vision Fund targeting external funding for a blank-check company, a source said, in a sign the group is regaining its mojo.
“I am a risk taker,” Son said on Thursday.
Rajeev Misra, CEO of SoftBank Investment Advisers which oversees the Vision Fund, said the market share gained by online commerce companies in the last six to eight months is more than what they gained in the previous four years put together.
“COVID has accelerated the acceleration of AI even further,” Misra told the same conference, adding in the 105 companies Vision Fund 1 and 2 have invested in, artificial intelligence is the core of their businesses.