Arab nations send food, medical supplies to disaster-hit Lebanon

Above, the UAE transport plane carrying 40 metric tons of critical medicine and food items, as well as nutritional supplements for children (WAM)
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Updated 10 August 2020

Arab nations send food, medical supplies to disaster-hit Lebanon

  • Saudi Arabia at the forefront of an international relief air bridge for Lebanon

DUBAI: Arab nations are rushing to provide humanitarian relief to disaster-hit Lebanon, delivering planeloads of food and medical supplies to aid those affected by the massive explosion that rocked Beirut on Tuesday.

The devastating blast, thought to be caused by a stockpile of ammonium nitrate unsafely stored in a port warehouse, left a trail of damage over much of the capital and killed more than 150 people and injured thousands of others.

A UAE transport plane carrying 40 metric tons of critical medicine and food items, as well as nutritional supplements for children, arrived in the Lebanese capital as part of the assistance being implemented by the Emirates Red Crescent.

“A comprehensive phased humanitarian plan has been put in place in response to the crisis, and during this stage the focus is laid on providing medical supplies in support of the Lebanese health facilities under the current tough circumstances to help them respond to the needs of the large number of victims,” Dr Mohammed Atiq Al-Falahi, the ERC Secretary General, said in a report from state news agency WAM.

Saudi Arabia is at the forefront of an international relief air bridge, with about 200 tons of medical and emergency supplies so far delivered by the three aircraft dispatched to Lebanon.

Egypt has dispatched a second military plane to Lebanon, loaded with large quantities of medical supplies and food.

Two aircraft from Kuwait laden with medical supplies and food have arrived at Beirut’s international airport as part of the ongoing aid efforts to help Lebanon.

“We have just received two Kuwaiti planes carrying emergency aid,” on instructions of the Kuwait leadership, embassy advisor Abdullah Al-Shaheen said, and added that support will continue “in this time of adversity.”


Iran: nuclear deal with world powers worth preserving

Updated 37 min 18 sec ago

Iran: nuclear deal with world powers worth preserving

  • Iran has been steadily breaking restrictions outlined in the 2018 nuclear deal on the amount of uranium it can enrich
  • ‘There is still a broad agreement among the international community that the JCPOA should be preserved’

BERLIN: The head of Iran’s nuclear agency said Monday that the landmark 2015 deal between Tehran and world powers on his country’s atomic program is struggling since the unilateral US withdrawal, but is still worth preserving.
Ali Akbar Salehi told delegates at a conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna that the so-called Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA, has been “caught in a quasi-stalemate situation” since President Donald Trump pulled the US out in 2018.
The deal promises Iran economic incentives in exchange for limits on its nuclear program. The remaining world powers in the deal – France, Germany, Britain, China and Russia – have been struggling to offset re-imposed American sanctions.
Iran has been steadily breaking restrictions outlined in the deal on the amount of uranium it can enrich, the purity it can enrich it to, and other limitations in order to pressure those countries to do more.
Salehi, speaking in a video address, said it’s of the “utmost importance” that those countries find a solution to resolve “the difficulties caused by the illegal withdrawal of the US from the deal.”
“There is still a broad agreement among the international community that the JCPOA should be preserved,” he said.
Speaking after Salehi, US Energy Secretary Dan Brouillette made no reference to the deal, saying only that the “United States remains committed to addressing the threats posed by the nuclear programs of both North Korea and Iran.”
“On top of its horrific record as the world’s largest state sponsor of terrorism, Iran has a lamentable history of providing only grudging, dilatory, and incomplete cooperation, if at all, with the IAEA. Iran must do more, much more, to ensure both timely and complete compliance with the safeguards obligations,” he said.
The ultimate goal of the JCPOA is to prevent Iran from being able to build a nuclear bomb — something Iran insists it does not want to do.
Though it has broken the pact’s limitations, it still has far less enriched uranium and lower-purity uranium than it had before signing the deal.
It has also continued to allow IAEA inspectors full access to its nuclear facilities, which the world powers still in the deal maintain is reason enough to try and keep it in place.
Iran recently granted the IAEA access to two sites dating from before the deal, which Director General Rafael Grossi said he hoped “will reinforce cooperation and enhance mutual trust.”