Canada and victims’ families press Iran for answers over downed Ukrainian jetliner

In this file photo rescue teams work amidst debris after a Ukrainian plane carrying 176 passengers crashed near Imam Khomeini airport in the Iranian capital Tehran early in the morning on January 8, 2020, killing everyone on board. (AFP/File Photo)
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Updated 24 August 2020

Canada and victims’ families press Iran for answers over downed Ukrainian jetliner

  • Many of the 176 victims killed in the crash were Canadian citizens or permanent residents
  • Iran’s Revolutionary Guard has said it accidentally shot down Ukraine International Airlines Flight PS752 on Jan. 8

MONTREAL: Canada and families of the victims of a downed Ukrainian jetliner are pressing Iran for additional answers, after an announcement by Tehran on Sunday provided “limited and selected information.”
The announcement by the head of Iran’s Civil Aviation Organization marked the first official report on the contents of the cockpit voice and data recordings, which were sent to France for analysis in July.
Iran’s Revolutionary Guard has said it accidentally shot down Ukraine International Airlines Flight PS752 on Jan. 8, mistaking it for a missile at a time when tensions were high between Iran and the United States.
Many of the 176 victims killed in the crash were Canadian citizens or permanent residents.

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READ MORE: Iran says European insurers should pay compensation for downed Ukrainian plane

Iran sends downed Ukrainian plane’s black box to France

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Tehran said the analysis shows the plane was hit by two missiles 25 seconds apart and that passengers were still alive for some time after the impact of the first blast.
“This preliminary report only provides limited and selected information regarding this tragic event,” Canada’s Transport Minister Marc Garneau and Foreign Affairs Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne said in a statement on Sunday night.
“The report only mentions what transpired after the first missile strike but not the second.”
They asked why the missiles were launched and why Iran’s air space was open.
An association representing families of the plane’s victims dismissed the report in a statement that said they needed to know why a second missile was fired at the aircraft.
Earlier on Sunday, Canada’s Transportation Safety Board (TSB) questioned why commercial airlines continued operating in the area affected by the conflict.
Under UN rules, Iran retains overall control of the investigation while the US and Ukraine are accredited as the countries where the jet was respectively built and operated. Canada has also played a role as the home of many of the victims on the downed plane.


Erdogan’s son-in-law leaves sovereign wealth fund

Updated 4 min 30 sec ago

Erdogan’s son-in-law leaves sovereign wealth fund

  • The 42-year-old quit as finance minister in a cryptic November 8 message on Instagram
  • His resignation was ignored by state media until it was formally accepted by Erdogan the next night

ANKARA: President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s son-in-law quit as the deputy head of Turkey’s huge sovereign wealth fund, completing a fall from grace that began with his surprise resignation as finance minister.
Berat Albayrak had been viewed as Turkey’s second most powerful figure until his chaotic departure from the government at the start of the month.
Married to the Turkish leader’s elder daughter, the 42-year-old quit as finance minister in a cryptic November 8 message on Instagram that cited health reasons.
His resignation from the helm of the Turkish economy was ignored by state media for more than 24 hours, until it was formally accepted by Erdogan the next night.
Albayrak’s two-year tenure as economy chief saw the lira lose 40 percent of its value against the dollar and the central bank burn though most of its reserves in trying to defend the currency.
His departure was linked to Erdogan’s appointment of a new market-friendly central banker whom Albayrak had strongly opposed.
Naci Agbal, the new central bank governor, sharply raised the main interest rate at his first policy meeting last week, helping the lira halt its slide.
Yet Albayrak still held on to his post as deputy head of the sovereign wealth fund, which was created in 2016 and now manages state assets officially valued at $22.6 billion.
Erdogan’s office said little about Albayrak’s departure, noting in a one-sentence statement that he “left the board of the sovereign wealth fund of Turkey after asking to take leave.”
He was appointed as its deputy head in 2018, the same year Erdogan became its official chief.