Naif Al-Harbi, head of research quality management at King Abdullah International Medical Research Center

Naif Al-Harbi
Short Url
Updated 23 September 2020

Naif Al-Harbi, head of research quality management at King Abdullah International Medical Research Center

Dr. Naif Al-Harbi is the director of vaccine development unit and head of research quality management at King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC).

KAIMRC recently confirmed its willingness to cooperate with the Health Ministry and the Saudi Food and Drug Authority to test vaccines that are currently in their trial phase.

Al-Harbi said that it was unprecedented to have nine vaccines in the third stage of clinical trials.

“Approval or disapproval of any drug normally follows the third stage of its clinical trials, which is the last stage,” he added. “Since the pandemic, KAIMRC has been in continuous contact with several drug companies in four countries (that are developing vaccines),” he added.

Al-Harbi obtained a bachelor’s degree in medical microbiology at Qassim University in 2006. In 2010, he completed his master’s degree in molecular medical microbiology from the University of Nottingham, UK.

He did a Ph.D. in molecular virology and vaccinology from the University of Oxford in 2014 and he pursued a fellowship in vaccinology there between 2015 and 2016.

Al-Harbi joined KAIMRC as a research technologist in 2007. His association with the center continued as an on-scholarship technologist throughout his studies.

In 2015, he became a postdoctoral researcher for almost two years, and in 2017 he joined KAIMRC’s research credentialing committee as a member, while simultaneously heading the biosafety office until March 2020.

He currently holds several positions at KAIMRC, including associate research scientist, director of the vaccine development unit (since April 2020) and head of research quality management (since March 2019).

He is also a member of numerous committees such as animal research and ethics, and research integrity and misconduct.

Al-Harbi has been a visiting fellow at the University of Oxford since January 2018. He is also co-lead in the pandemic preparedness unit at the G20 Secretariat.


Saudi Arabia’s public spaces dotted with pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Photo/Shutterstock
Updated 19 October 2020

Saudi Arabia’s public spaces dotted with pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

  • According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage

JEDDAH: Splashes of pink are appearing in Saudi Arabia’s public spaces to raise awareness about the importance of breast cancer screening.
A number of campaigns are underway this month to support this outreach — in malls, on the street and on billboards.
Pamphlets are being handed out, videos and interactive pictures are on display, there are fundraising activities such as hiking and biking, and medical students have been talking to shoppers and passers-by as part of efforts to increase people’s knowledge.
In Jeddah there was a Tai Chi class on the city’s waterfront, headed by Amatallah Bahaziq, that was attended by female members of Bliss Runners and Bolts. Another event was a bike ride organized by Jeddah Cyclists that included men and women.
A number of major cities across the Kingdom have also seen pop-up campaigns, with specialists ready to answer questions and play a proactive role in spreading proper knowledge and information about the disease, its detection and the chances of survival when detected early.

HIGHLIGHT

According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage. This late stage detection is mostly because some women believe that a lack of symptoms means an absence of the disease.

The Zahra Breast Cancer Association is one of Saudi Arabia’s leading organizations dedicated to raising awareness about the disease. It has been supporting cancer patients and survivors and normalizing conversations about breast cancer among the community, with a renewed emphasis during October which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.
“Given the circumstances (due to the pandemic) we focused our efforts to raise awareness to the importance of early detection virtually,” a representative from the association told Arab News. “With billboards and visuals spread across Saudi cities, we’re still following through with our campaign promise to raise awareness each year and send the message across: Early detection will save your life.”
According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage. This late stage detection is mostly because some women believe that a lack of symptoms means an absence of the disease.