Britain, France and Germany summon Iran ambassadors over detention of dual citizens

Zaghari-Ratcliffe was visited at her family home by Revolutionary Guards officers this week in an attempt to intimidate her. (File/AFP)
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Updated 24 September 2020

Britain, France and Germany summon Iran ambassadors over detention of dual citizens

  • Britain’s foreign office summoned the Iranian ambassador to the UK on Tuesday to meet senior officials
  • France is trying to secure the release of French-Iranian academic Fariba Adelka who was arrested in 2018

LONDON: Britain, France and Germany are summoning Iranian ambassadors in a diplomatic protest against the Islamic Republic’s detention of dual nationals and the harsh treatment that political prisoners endure.
Britain’s foreign office summoned the Iranian ambassador to the UK Hamid Baeidinejad on Tuesday to meet senior officials, The Guardian reported. A letter handed to the ambassador seen by the British newspaper said that Iran’s policy of arbitrary detention was seriously damaging its international standing.
The Iranian ambassadors in Paris and Berlin are also being summoned this week.
The coordinated protest against Iranian human rights abuses is the first of its kind by the three E3 countries and comes as concern grows over Iranian security forces increasing pressure on dual-national prisoners.
This includes British-Iranian dual national Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe being told that she will face another trial after a new charge was brought against her.
Zaghari-Ratcliffe is nearing the end of her five-year sentence for spying charges. She was visited at her family home where she is under house arrest by Revolutionary Guards officers this week in an attempt to intimidate her, The Guardian reported.
France, meanwhile, is trying to secure the release of French-Iranian academic Fariba Adelka who was arrested in 2018. She has been moved from the notorious Evin prison to the Ministry of Intelligence detention center.
Britain also set out its concern about grave human rights abuses in Iran in the letter that was handed to Baeidinejad, The Guardian reported.
British citizens and dual nationals are suffering in Iranian prisons in harsh conditions and without justification, the letter said. It argued that they have been arbitrarily detained and deserve to be released and reunited with their families.
The letter also expressed concern about Iran’s repression of human rights activists and defenders inside the country, and its harassment of media and cultural organizations.


Suspected Boko Haram extremists kill at least 40 farmers in Nigeria

Updated 37 min 26 sec ago

Suspected Boko Haram extremists kill at least 40 farmers in Nigeria

  • The farmers were reportedly rounded up and summarily killed by armed insurgents
  • Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari expressed grief over the killings
MAIDGURI, Nigeria: Suspected members of the militant group Boko Haram killed at least 40 rice farmers and fishermen while they were harvesting crops in Nigeria’s northern Borno State, officials said.
The attack was staged Saturday in a rice field in Garin Kwashebe, a Borno community known for rice farming, on the day residents of the state were casting votes for the first time in 13 years to elect local government councils, though many didn’t go to cast their ballots.
The farmers were reportedly rounded up and summarily killed by armed insurgents.
Malam Zabarmari, a leader of a rice farmers association in Borno state, confirmed the massacre.
“The farmers were attacked at the Garin-Kwashebe rice field in Zabarmari community, and according to reports reaching us since afternoon, about 40 of them were killed,” he said, adding that it likely could be up to 60 people killed.
Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari expressed grief over the killings.
“I condemn the killing of our hardworking farmers by terrorists in Borno State. The entire country is hurt by these senseless killings. My thoughts are with their families in this time of grief. May their souls Rest In Peace,” he said in a statement.
Buhari said the government had given all the needed support to the armed forces “to take all necessary steps to protect the country’s population and its territory.”
A member of the House of Representatives, Ahmed Satomi, who represents the Jere Federal constituency of Borno, said at least 44 burials will take place Sunday.
“Farmers and fishermen were killed in cold blood. Over 60 farmers were affected, but we only have so far received 44 corpses from the farms and we are preparing for their burials today, Sunday by God’s grace,” the federal lawmaker said.
Boko Haram and a breakaway faction, the Islamic State West Africa Province, are both active in the region. Boko Haram’s more than decade-long insurgency has left thousands dead and displaced tens of thousands. Officials say Boko Haram members often force villagers to pay illegal taxes by taking their livestock or crops. But over time, some villagers have begun to resist the extortion.
Satomi said the farmers in Garin Kwashebe were attacked because they had disarmed and arrested a Boko Haram gunman on Friday who had been tormenting them.
“A lone gunman, who was a member of Boko Haram came to harass the farmers by ordering them to give him money and also cook for him. While he was waiting for the food to be cooked, the farmers seized the moment he stepped into the toilet to snatch his rifle and tied him up,” he said.
“They later handed him over to the security. But sadly, the security forces did not protect the courageous farmer. And in reprisal for daring them, the Boko Haram mobilized and came to attack them on their farms.”
Insurgents also torched the rice farms before leaving, he said.