A Middle East coronavirus web resource has global resonance

One of the most popular websites for monitoring activity relating to the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus comes from the Middle East region. (AFP/File Photo)
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Updated 26 September 2020

A Middle East coronavirus web resource has global resonance

  • Corona Meter is a free resource that attracts tens of thousands of visitors every day from across the world
  • Building the coronameter.co website took the team of developers a few days from conception to launch

DUBAI: One of the most popular websites for monitoring activity relating to the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus comes from this very region. Launched in March, coronameter.co is a free resource that attracts tens of thousands of visitors every day, getting traffic from as far afield as Argentina and India.

Using daily data from the renowned Johns Hopkins University in the US, the website displays a vast array of statistics presented for easy comprehension.

Data includes the total number of confirmed cases, mortality rates and infection doubling time in the preceding seven days, all broken down by country. A time-lapse graph shows how the disease initially struck China, Iran and Italy before the US, Brazil and Britain became the worst affected nations.

There is also a globe that enables users to click on any country and see its COVID-19 statistics.

“It all started when the (World Health Organization) classified the coronavirus as a pandemic because, at that point, I knew it was going to be something for the long run. We had this urge to stay on top of it,” said Paris-based entrepreneur Amr Sobhy.




Paris-based entrepreneur Amr Sobhy who founded wesbite Corona Meter. (Supplied)

The 31-year-old talked with his friend and Corona Meter co-creator Mohamed Reda Eldehiry about their approach. Building the website took the team a few days from conception to launch, although the original idea has been expanded steadily, with more data points and graphics added.

“It’s a perpetual work in progress,” Sobhy said. “We wanted to provide something reliable in Arabic. Once we had enough data, we wanted to use (it) to answer the questions we thought were important.

“I wanted to see how the pandemic was developing over time in order to understand the gravity of the situation. Once we had things up and running, I started adding interesting visualizations.”

Initially available in Arabic and English, the website is now also in Russian, Hindi, French, Italian and Spanish.

“It’s an automated data stream although we have to keep on updating the software because inevitably there are bugs due to it not being designed to run on every device,” Sobhy said.

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As the demands grew, another engineer, Osama Sayed, joined the team to help manage the website.

What sets this product apart from other international ones is that it is accessible in the region. “Once you get the data, the next step is to use it to give people something meaningful,” said Sobhy, who is also the founder and CEO of PushBots, which sold two software-as-a-service (SaaS) products to an Austrian company last year.

IPtrace gives applications users’ geolocation data, while CurrencyStack provides real-time exchange rates for over 150 currencies.

“There are a lot of ways to make digital products, and we from the MENA region can compete globally,” he said. “Code is a building block to solve problems. It’s not an end but a means.”




Corona Meter co-creator Mohamed Reda Eldehiry. (Supplied)

He believes the success of Corona Meter shows that the people of the Middle East can create products and services that will resonate globally.

“What I could see us do more in MENA is to use existing technologies to answer our own questions because otherwise, we’re just hoping that someone else does it for us,” Sobhy said.

“With technology comes the empowerment that we don’t have to wait. We can actually do it ourselves.”

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This report is being published by Arab News as a partner of the Middle East Exchange, which was launched by the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Global Initiatives to reflect the vision of the UAE prime minister and ruler of Dubai to explore the possibility of changing the status of the Arab region.


Court orders authorities to reveal Israeli citizenship criteria to Palestinian Jerusalemites

Updated 26 November 2020

Court orders authorities to reveal Israeli citizenship criteria to Palestinian Jerusalemites

  • Without Israeli citizenship, residents of East Jerusalem could not obtain an Israeli passport, vote in national elections, or work in state government jobs
  • Vast majority of Jerusalem’s 330,000 stateless Palestinians have not applied

AMMAN: An Israeli court has forced state authorities to reveal the criteria that need to be met for Palestinian Jerusalem youth to become citizens of Israel.

The judicial order will mean that approximately 20,000 Palestinians aged between 18 and 21 living in East Jerusalem will now know the requirements when petitioning for Israeli citizenship, which is not automatically granted to them as residents of the city.

The vast majority of Jerusalem’s 330,000 stateless Palestinians have not applied, nor have the desire, to become Israelis. But the court decision should in future make the application process easier for those interested in carrying an Israeli passport and having the protection of the Israeli government regarding their legal status.

Jerusalem attorney, Mohammed Dahdal, who has practiced civil and human rights law for more than 30 years, noted that without Israeli citizenship, residents of East Jerusalem could not obtain an Israeli passport, vote in national elections, or work in state government jobs, among other things.

However, they did pay taxes to Israel and received social benefits such as national insurance, unemployment payments, and healthcare coverage.

Dahdal told Arab News that after 1988, when Jordan disengaged from the West Bank, which included East Jerusalem, Jerusalemites became stateless citizens. He said the ruling had come about after a Palestinian from Jerusalem had appealed to the court after revealing a loophole in the law.

He noted that the court decision, published by the Israeli Ministry of the Interior, made four conditions to ensure receipt of an Israeli passport. “That the applicant has no other citizenship, that they were born in Israel (for Israel, East and West Jerusalem are both parts of Israel), that the applicant is between 18 and 21 years old, and has lived continuously in Israel during the five years preceding applying for citizenship.”

The lawyer added that the Israeli government had fought in court to have the criteria for citizenship kept under wraps.

Former Jordanian member of parliament, Audeh Kawwas, who was on Wednesday appointed as a member of the Jordanian Senate, told Arab News: “If the aim is to solve the statelessness issue of Jerusalemites, I am for it and I have spoken about it (as a committee member) in the World Council of Churches.

“However, if this is an attempt to disenfranchise Palestinians and to make the city more Israeli, then I am totally opposed.”

Hazem Kawasmi, a community activist in Jerusalem, told Arab News that many young Palestinian Jerusalemites were in a desperate situation, as no government or institution was taking care of them and their needs.

He said: “They are living under occupation with daily harassment from the police and Israeli intelligence and face all kinds of racism and enmity.

“Israeli citizenship helps them get high-skilled jobs and it is a prerequisite for many jobs. It helps them travel for tourism or work to Europe and the US without the cumbersome, complicated procedures of getting visas, that is if they get it at all.

“Finally, Israeli citizenship makes the youth feel safe not to lose their residency in Jerusalem and movement and work in Israel,” he added.

Khalil Assali, a member of the Jerusalem Waqf and an observer of Jerusalem affairs, told Arab News that he was doubtful that Israel would speed up the process for granting Israeli citizenship. “They have made this move to show their newly established Arab friends that they are acting democratically.”

Hijazi Risheq, head of the Jerusalem Merchants’ committee, told Arab News that the Israelis were looking for ways to turn the city into a Jewish one. By giving citizenship to youth between the ages of 18 and 21, Israel was aiming to deter them from carrying out hostile acts against Israel and keep them away from the Palestinian National Authority and its security forces, he said.

Jerusalem-based human rights activist, Rifaat Kassis, said: “The idea that Jerusalem is Arab has become an empty slogan. Meanwhile, Israeli racism has become the overriding power that forces Jerusalemites trying to have a dignified life with their families to live under difficult conditions.”