What We Are Buying Today: Zense

What We Are Buying Today: Zense
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Updated 03 October 2020

What We Are Buying Today: Zense

What We Are Buying Today: Zense
  • Zense’s oils, essences, and flower waters are 100 percent organic and its specially created personalized blends are free of any harmful chemicals

Zense is a feminine-centric healing perfumery brand that operates as a home-based boutique offering 100 percent natural, hand-made, plant-based products to help revitalize the mind, body, and spirit — but with a twist.
There is already a plethora of organic and natural products on the market, but Zense is different in offering customized products.
Products include an all-in-one body, face, and hair mist that contains rosewater, vanilla essential oil, and rose petals from Beirut, Taif, and Bulgaria, along with a range of essential oil blends to anoint energy points on the body and inspired by some of history’s great feminine spirits including, Khatijah, Merriam, Hatshepsut, Eve, Asya, Joan, and Sophia.
Every blend has its own signature fragrance and ingredients that tackle a specific need for individual customers.
Zense’s oils, essences, and flower waters are 100 percent organic and its specially created personalized blends are free of any harmful chemicals. Blends and mists are made to order and are delivered from freshly created batches.
The entire creation process employs the application of scientific knowledge utilizing the power and potential of herbs, essences, and flowers. For more information visit the Instagram account @zense.me


Bella Hadid, Dua Lipa inspire Hugo Comte’s first photo book

Bella Hadid photographed by Hugo Comte. Supplied
Bella Hadid photographed by Hugo Comte. Supplied
Updated 24 February 2021

Bella Hadid, Dua Lipa inspire Hugo Comte’s first photo book

Bella Hadid photographed by Hugo Comte. Supplied

DUBAI: French fashion photographer Hugo Comte released his first career photography book this week. The new monograph shines the spotlight on all the women who have inspired him along the way, including part-Palestinian model Bella Hadid, British-Albanian popstar Dua Lipa and Russian supermodel Irina Shayk, among others.

Comte collaborated with art director David McKelvey on the 200-page-book and focused on featuring existing and never-before-seen portraiture of his muses in the new tome.

The book, which is self-published, celebrates the first five years of his photography career. 

In addition to previously published portraits, the book also features never-before-seen works — special pieces made in collaboration with airbrush artists to repaint his imagery, as well as unique computer-generated pieces.

Dua Lipa photographed by Hugo Comte. Supplied

“I really wanted to create an object that is the symbol of my first years of work. I started to really feel that people created a sort of identity around me from that time period,” he said to WWD.

“I feel (portraiture) is the most intimate part of my work and where I express myself the best. Group shots don’t allow such intimacy. When I shoot an image, I always try to give the feeling that the woman is not being photographed but that she is looking through the camera, which gives a direct contact between the viewer and the muse,” he added.

The prolific imagemaker’s newly-released tome is untitled, instead the photographer wants to let his work speak for itself.

After arriving on the scene not long ago, he has quickly ascended to being one of the most-followed photographers on the Internet.

A page from the new book. Supplied

He is known for working with some of the world’s most-photographed women, such as Kendall Jenner, Vittoria Ceretti and Adut Akech. 

Memorably, he lensed Lipa’s “Future Nostalgia” album artwork.

The launch of the book is accompanied by an exhibition at Los Angeles’ Tase Gallery, where Comte will have a one-week show from Feb. 25 – March 3 of seven selected works in the brand new gallery space. 

The Book is also available for sale on HugoComte.com. It is limited to 2,500 copies, the first 50 of which have been signed by Comte.


How Sara Elemary turned personal struggle into a fashion label

How Sara Elemary turned personal struggle into a fashion label
Updated 24 February 2021

How Sara Elemary turned personal struggle into a fashion label

How Sara Elemary turned personal struggle into a fashion label

DUBAI: Personal struggles sometimes make for the most successful businesses, or at least that was the case for Egyptian-Canadian designer Sara Elemary. 

After finding a gap in the modest fashion market 12 years ago, she decided to launch her own eponymous streetwear brand in 2009. 

Sara Elemary is an Egyptian-Canadian designer. (Supplied)

“There was a great shortage in modest wear, and I personally used to struggle,” she said in an interview with Arab News. “It was really hard to find anything. You would always have to layer pieces and you ended up wearing a lot during the summer time.”

The designer said she found it really hard to express her identity through fashion at the time. So, she took it upon herself to make it easier for people who were also finding it challenging to stay stylish, yet modest. 

Over the past few years, Elemary said that there has been a notable shift in the modest fashion industry. “It does not have to be wearing a hijab (a headscarf), but just the idea of modesty. We’ve been seeing it in international fashion shows.”

This shift gave Elemary’s made-in-Egypt label more exposure, she said. “Society and media started to look at modest brands in a different way. It does not have to be tacky or different, on the contrary, the acceptance in society for modest fashion has increased a lot,” she explained.

However, with that, competition has increased. “It puts a lot of pressure (on me), because I have to be more creative,” she said. 

The designer’s main goal is to present “modest wear differently, with a twist of elegance” to target not only conservative women, but all women. “My challenge is that I want to create something that everyone can accept,” she said.

Elemary recently launched her Fall/Winter 2020-21 collection titled “Urban Lines.” Bold colors, statement pieces, striking lines and urban landscapes all fuse together in the designer’s latest line.

The designer also merged different designs and fabrics together when it came to styling the campaign shots — plaid shirts over joggers and camo prints with sequins, highlighting the line’s endless mix-and-match possibilities.

One of the Elemary’s main dreams is to see her creations at high-end UK department store Selfridges. 

“One of the things that also really matters to me is when I am traveling and see someone wearing my designs. I really love that,” she said. 


Celebrity makeup artist Hindash to launch own brand

 Celebrity makeup artist Hindash to launch own brand
Updated 22 February 2021

Celebrity makeup artist Hindash to launch own brand

 Celebrity makeup artist Hindash to launch own brand

DUBAI: Celebrity makeup artist Mohammed Hindash announced on Monday he is launching his first beauty brand, Hindash Cosmetics.

The label is set to launch in March 2021. 

The Dubai-based artist, who has not yet revealed the products, took to Instagram to share the news with his 1.1 million followers. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by hindash (@hindash)

“Years in manifestation, I can now finally share the birth of my brand. Are you ready for an internal beauty intervention?” he wrote. 

Hindash started his journey on YouTube, reaching over 68 million views with over 1.7 million subscribers, and is now the latest in line of notable figures to venture into the makeup business. 

He worked with some of the world’s most renowned celebrities such as British model Naomi Campbell, “Mean Girls” actress Lindsay Lohan, US model Chanel Iman, Egyptian actress Mona Zaki and many more. 


Emirati label Qasimi presents its Fall 2021 collection at London Fashion Week

Qasimi Fall 2021 Ready-to-Wear. Supplied
Qasimi Fall 2021 Ready-to-Wear. Supplied
Updated 21 February 2021

Emirati label Qasimi presents its Fall 2021 collection at London Fashion Week

Qasimi Fall 2021 Ready-to-Wear. Supplied

DUBAI: In these strange and unprecedented times, it certainly feels like the best kind of garments are ones that wrap you up in a warm hug, offering a serene sense of protection and comfort. Qasimi’s Fall 2021 collection belongs in this category.

 “The new collection is centered around the concept of being wrapped and being hugged and protected during such an uncertain time,” explained Hoor Al-Qasimi, the Emirati creative director of the London-based menswear brand, to Arab News.

Qasimi Fall 2021 Ready-to-Wear. Supplied

Seeking inspiration from Islamic architecture — more specifically the “Mashrabiya,” which is an element of traditional Arabic architecture used since the Middle Ages up to the mid-20th century — Al-Qasimi’s  structured and tailored  garments envelope the body inside them, embracing the human form.

Qasimi Fall 2021 Ready-to-Wear. Supplied

Al-Qasimi presented the new offering via a digital presentation during London Fashion Week, which is currently underway until Feb. 23.

Considering Al-Qasimi is a patron of the arts (she is the founder of the Sharjah Art Foundation) it is no surprise that she decided to present the Fall 2021 collection by way of a fashion film.

The video was a collaborative effort between interdisciplinary performance company Bakani Pick-Up, which choreographed the presentation, and Visionist, who composed the soundtrack. “It has been a wonderful experience and I look forward to more similar collaborations in the future,” noted Al-Qasimi.

As for the collection itself, the lineup was punctuated with a diverse and interesting range of fabrics inspired by the interior settings of the meeting rooms used by the Bloomsbury Group, a cohort of writers, intellectuals, philosophers and artists. Materials included chenille and mohair in pieces like an oversized parka and trench coat, cargo pants and kilt.

Qasimi Fall 2021 Ready-to-Wear. Supplied

When it came to the color palette, Al-Qasimi looked to Yemen. Softer notes of laurel and muted lime are contrasted with ivy, deep purple, cumin, copper and saffron. Prints take a rebellious stance, riffing on the region’s military camouflage but offset with a softer tulip motifs found in ceramics and tiles across the Islamic world.

The words of late German statesman Konrad Adenauer, “We all live under the same sky,” were printed onto detachable panels and outerwear, while “Dream!” written in Arabic calligraphy was embroidered onto jerseywear. “Free at Last,” a reference to Martin Luther King Jr.’s 1963 speech, also appeared in the offering.

Qasimi Fall 2021 Ready-to-Wear. Supplied

The new collection is Al-Qasimi’s third for the London-based brand since taking over the reigns after her twin brother Khalid Al-Qasimi’s passing in 2019. Although fashion is a new territory for the creative director, the Sharjah-born designer revealed that she is “slowly getting the hang of things.”

She said: “I think the most important thing is to listen to everyone around you and learn from their experiences.”


The best fashion from the 2021 Saudi Cup

Designer Honayda Serafi attends the 2021 Saudi Cup wearing her own design. Instagram
Designer Honayda Serafi attends the 2021 Saudi Cup wearing her own design. Instagram
Updated 21 February 2021

The best fashion from the 2021 Saudi Cup

Designer Honayda Serafi attends the 2021 Saudi Cup wearing her own design. Instagram

DUBAI: The stakes were high at the 2021 Saudi Cup — dubbed “the world’s richest horse race” — and while the action took place at the King Abdul Aziz race track in Riyadh, most eyes and camera lenses were fixated on the fashion displayed during the event.

The fashionable guests in attendance, which included royals, designers and influencers, turned up wearing embellished abayas and overlays that paid homage to the country’s rich culture.

Womenswear designer Honayda Serafi, who has seen her pieces donned by the likes of Shay Mitchell and Janelle Monae, turned heads in a slew of ensembles that she created specifically for the two-day event.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Honayda (@honaydaofficial)

For the opening night of the races, the fashion designer turned up wearing a white, button-up dress worn underneath a heavily-embellished overlay that was embroidered with hundreds of tiny gold sequins and beads. She paired the regal look with a white headscarf and layered pearl necklaces.

Her second look was a sea green, half-pleated abaya with golden applique that included a striking palm tree motif made entirely out of gold sequins that served as a sartorial nod to her heritage.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Honayda (@honaydaofficial)

In addition to dreaming up her own wardrobe for the event, Serafi was also responsible for conjuring up the head-turning look worn by 29-year-old equestrian Dalma Malhas.

The show jumper was a vision wearing a deep purple ensemble that borrowed elements from Saudi culture by way of metallic coin and tassel embellishments.

Also in attendance at the two-day event was fashion influencer and stylist Hala Al-Harithy, who wore a graphic, Asseri printed abaya and dress by Saudi label Aram Designs.

The label, founded by Arwa Alammari, also found a fan in Nojoud Alrumaihi who opted for the womenswear brand’s Sadu-inspired trench coat and a matching handmade headpiece.

Meanwhile, beauty influencer Yara Al-Namlah opted for something a little more muted in the form of a beige longline coat with a Sadu fabric overlay from R9 Designs, which she paired with a neatly-tied maroon head scarf and Hermes handbag.

Scroll down to see some of our favorite fashion looks from the 2021 Saudi Cup.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by WeBlog. (@weblog_sa)