What We Are Doing Today: Story and Toy

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Updated 10 October 2020

What We Are Doing Today: Story and Toy

  • The program’s online shop provides simple step-by-step online courses for mothers and caregivers on authentic play-based learning, which is the key to raising problem solvers, creators, and future leaders

Nature is perfectly designed for our children: It stimulates their senses and helps them develop all the skills they need in order to grow. Story and Toy is a Saudi play-based learning program inspired by children and nature and founded by Maram Al-Ameel.
The program offers an ideal way for mothers of preschoolers aged 3-6 to provide a simple yet powerful playing experience for their children.
Story and Toy offers many science experiments for kids to explore the nature of their environment. Problem-solving exercises, like how to set up a tent or stack rocks, and experiments like how to make mud thick or runny help keep kids active while also honing their thinking skills.
The program’s online shop provides simple step-by-step online courses for mothers and caregivers on authentic play-based learning, which is the key to raising problem solvers, creators, and future leaders.
Creative drama — a complete preschool educational system that encourages kids’ curiosity through role-playing — is another program offered by Story and Toy. Different scenarios help children build their vocabulary in new subjects. You can reach them through https://storyandtoy.com


Startup of the Week: A perfect blend of tradition and modernity

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Updated 20 October 2020

Startup of the Week: A perfect blend of tradition and modernity

  • The brand is not just about making profits using cultural symbols; it is also introducing the country and its culture to the outside world

Technological advancements in the past few decades have given rise to a new global culture, which encompasses geographical boundaries. People living thousands of miles apart share similar likes and dislikes.
Despite this globalization, local or indigenous culture continues to play an important role; it gives you a sense of belonging to your homeland. With this idea in mind, two Saudi women decided to give a local touch to modern things.
“Things by Haa” launched by Haifa Alshathry and Halah Al-Ahmed offers a variety of items such as passport covers, folders, art pieces, and pouches.
What makes these products stand out is the use of a traditional Saudi fabric called “Sadu.”
“It was something we believed in and wanted to see in real life. We wanted a goal to achieve,” Alshathry told Arab News. Sadu is a tribal craft that portrays Arabian nomadic peoples’ cultural heritage. Alshathry said it is an integral part of our history.
The most popular item at “Things by Haa” is the Sadu pouch, which comes in different sizes. Al-Ahmad, the co-founder, said: “We want to revive the Saudi identity in a modern way.” She said that they wanted to strengthen their ties with the country’s rich past.
The brand did not face many challenges as the two partners started their project as a pastime. Initially, the commercial aspect was not their focus. Alshathry said: “However, it taught us a lot in terms of how to deal with different people and how to believe in your dreams and ideas.”
Recently, many retailers, stores, and companies contacted the duo for customized products for National Day.
“This is exactly what we wanted because on Saudi National Day we often looked for something that represented our culture,” Alshathry said.
Harvey Nichols, a luxury store, promoted “Things by Haa” as well and that too is a big accomplishment for the brand.
“They chose us for the National Day campaign and it was an honor to be a part of this international company,” she added.
The brand is not just appealing to the Saudis, it also attracts non-Saudis.
“When non-Saudis come to us and buy our products, it’s a joy to see their reaction and feedback whenever they see our products. They ask us about what would be an appropriate gift for their friends and families living abroad.”
The brand is not just about making profits using cultural symbols; it is also introducing the country and its culture to the outside world.