Heat force Game 6, top Lakers to stave off elimination

Heat force Game 6, top Lakers to stave off elimination
Miami Heat forward Jimmy Butler shoots against Los Angeles Lakers forward Anthony Davis (3) during the fourth quarter in game five of the 2020 NBA Finals Lake Buena Vista, Florida, on Oct 9, 2020. (Kim Klement-USA TODAY Sports)
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Updated 10 October 2020

Heat force Game 6, top Lakers to stave off elimination

Heat force Game 6, top Lakers to stave off elimination
  • The Lakers were seconds away from the title before the Heat rallied to save the season

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Florida: The trophy was ready.
Jimmy Butler and the Miami Heat delayed its appearance. The NBA Finals are not over, not after Butler and the Heat pulled off a virtuoso performance in Game 5 on Friday night.
Butler had 35 points, 12 rebounds and 11 assists, and the Heat watched Danny Green’s wide-open 3-pointer in the final seconds bounce off the rim on the way to beating Los Angeles 111-108 — cutting the Lakers’ lead in the title series to 3-2.
Game 6 is Sunday night.
Duncan Robinson had 26 points for Miami, which used seven players. Kendrick Nunn had 14 points, Bam Adebayo 13, Tyler Herro 12 and Jae Crowder 11. The seventh player, Andre Iguodala, didn’t score.
They had enough.
LeBron James had 40 points, 13 rebounds and seven assists for the Lakers. Anthony Davis scored 28 points, and Kentavious Caldwell-Pope had 16.
The Lakers were seconds away from the title before the Heat rallied to save the season.
Los Angeles broke out all the stops: Davis had shiny gold sneakers on, the hue similar to the Larry O’Brien Trophy, and the team made the decision earlier in the week to skip on the scheduled purple uniforms and wear the black ones designed and inspired by Kobe Bryant instead.
They were 4-0 in those uniforms. They’re 4-1 now.
But Bryant, oh, how he would have loved this fight. Drama, all the way to the end.
Robinson’s 3-pointer with 3:13 left put Miami up by two, and started a stretch where the next nine scoring possessions from either side resulted in a tie or a lead change.
Back and forth they went. Butler got fouled with 46.7 seconds left, then slumped over the baseline video boards, clearly exhausted. He made both foul shots for a one-point lead; Davis’ putback with 21.8 seconds left got the Lakers back on top.
Heat coach Erik Spoelstra used his last timeout before the ensuing possession, just to buy Butler a couple minutes of rest. Butler drove the lane, drew contact and made both with 16.8 seconds left for a 109-108 lead.
The Lakers’ mission at that point could not have been more simple: Get a basket, win a title.
They couldn’t do it. James found reen all alone for a top-of-the-key 3-pointer which missed, and Herro finished it off with two free throws.
Miami was up 93-82 with 10:17 left when James made his sixth 3-pointer of the night — on eight tries to that point.
It was go time for the Lakers.
James’ 3 started a 17-3 run over the next 4:50. Caldwell-Pope hit a 3-pointer to put the Lakers up 97-96, then added a basket in transition about a minute later. Nobody was seated on the Lakers’ bench. The Heat went frigid.
But behind Butler, they rallied.
Butler became the sixth player in NBA Finals history to have multiple triple-doubles in the same title series: Magic Johnson and James have both done it three times, while Larry Bird, Wilt Chamberlain and Draymond Green have done it once.
The Heat led 88-82 after three quarters, scoring 28 points in that period — and getting 14 of those points on three possessions.
Butler scored while drawing a flagrant-1 foul from Dwight Howard to start a three-point play, and Robinson made a 3-pointer on the bonus possession — the sequence taking things from a tie game to a 76-70 Heat lead in a matter of 13 seconds.
Crowder’s four-point play with 3:01 left in the third put Miami up by five, and Robinson had a four-point play in the final minute of the quarter to put the Heat up six.
James had 15 points in the second quarter, his eighth quarter this season with at least that many — second in the playoffs — and the Lakers needed them all to keep Miami from building what was briefly looking like a solid lead.
The Heat led by as many as 11 in the second quarter, but James kept the Lakers afloat. Butler had 22 by the break, and Miami took a 60-56 lead into the half.

TIP-INS
Heat: Point guard Goran Dragic (torn left plantar fascia) missed his fourth consecutive game. He was hurt in the first half of Game 1. ... Butler had 22 points in the first half, the second-most in Heat finals history. Dwyane Wade had 24 at halftime of Game 4 of the 2006 finals.
Lakers: James passed Karl Malone for No. 2 on the NBA’s all-time scoring list — including playoff and regular-season games. ... It was playoff game No. 259 for James, tying Derek Fisher for the most in NBA playoff history.
Lakers: James passed Karl Malone for No. 2 on the NBA’s career scoring list — including playoff and regular-season games. ... James tied Derek Fisher’s playoff record of 259 appearances.

BUBBLE STATS
Not counting the 33 scrimmages before the seeding-game portion of the regular season resumed on July 30 at Disney, this was the 171st game played in the bubble. Herro and Robinson have appeared in the most, with 28 apiece; several players have appeared in 27 including James, Davis, Green, Crowder, Kyle Kuzma and Iguodala.


Postponed Tokyo Olympics to cost extra $2.4bn

Updated 04 December 2020

Postponed Tokyo Olympics to cost extra $2.4bn

Postponed Tokyo Olympics to cost extra $2.4bn
  • The extra costs come as officials work to build enthusiasm for the first Games postponed in peacetime,
  • Tokyo 2020 said an additional $1.5 billion would be needed for operational costs related to the delay

TOKYO: The coronavirus-delayed Tokyo Olympics will cost at least an extra $2.4 billion, organizers said Friday, with the unprecedented postponement and a raft of pandemic health measures ballooning an already outsized budget.
The extra costs come as officials work to build enthusiasm for the first Games postponed in peacetime, insisting the massive event can go ahead next year even if the pandemic is not under control.
But more spending, on top of the previous budget of about $13 billion, could further harden public opinion in Japan, where polls this year showed a majority of people think the Games should be postponed again or canceled together.
“Whether it’s seen as too much or that we have done well to contain the costs, I think it depends on how you look at it,” Tokyo 2020 CEO Toshiro Muto told reporters.
“We have done all we can to earn the public’s understanding,” he added.
Tokyo 2020 said an additional $1.5 billion would be needed for operational costs related to the delay, with another $900 million in spending on coronavirus countermeasures.
The dollar figures are calculated at an exchange rate of 107 yen, and the total is around $2.56 billion at today’s rate. The costs look set to rise further, with Tokyo 2020 saying it would also release an additional $250 million in “contingency” funds.

The new spending swells a budget that was set last year at around $13 billion, and will add to disquiet about the cost of the Games after an audit report last year argued the national government was spending significantly more than originally planned.
The extra costs will be split between Tokyo, the organizing committee and the national government. The International Olympic Committee will not be chipping in, but has agreed to waive its sponsor royalty fee for the first time, organizers said.
The unprecedented decision to delay the Games has thrown up a plethora of extra costs, from rebooking venues and transport to retaining the huge organizing committee staff.
And with organizers committed to hosting the Games even if the pandemic remains a threat, extensive safety measures will be needed.
Tokyo 2020 this week released a 54-page plan they said would make it possible to hold the Games, including restrictions on athletes touching and fans cheering, and an infection control center in the Olympic Village.
Organizers have tried to scale back elements of the Games, offering fewer free tickets, scrapping athlete welcome ceremonies and making savings on mascots, banners and meals, but so far they have cut just $280 million in spending.
And on Thursday, they said 18 percent of Olympic tickets sold in Japan will be refunded, with domestic fans demanding their money back on about 810,000 of the 4.45 million tickets sold in the country.


Organizers hope to now resell those tickets, and demand for seats at the Games was high before the pandemic.
But enthusiasm has since waned, with a poll in July revealing that just one in four people wanted to see the event held in 2021, and most backing either further delay or cancelation.
Tokyo 2020 President Yoshiro Mori said the spending plan was carefully considered and he hoped people would accept it.
“If you have a drink, you could say your glass is half-full, or half empty. It depends on how you look at it,” he told reporters.
“There’s a rationale behind this plan. I hope the Japanese people will understand it.”
Tokyo 2020’s final price tag has been hotly disputed, with an audit report last year estimating the national government spent nearly 10 times its original budget between 2013-2018.
Organizers countered that the estimate included items not directly related to the Games.