Super rare, purple-pink diamond up for auction, could fetch $38 million

Super rare, purple-pink diamond up for auction, could fetch $38 million
Mined by Russian diamond producer Alrosa, the 14.83-carat diamond was cut from the largest pink crystal ever found in Russia. (AP)
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Updated 12 October 2020

Super rare, purple-pink diamond up for auction, could fetch $38 million

Super rare, purple-pink diamond up for auction, could fetch $38 million
  • The oval gem is named after a Russian ballet ‘The Spirit of the Rose’
  • Pink diamonds are both rare and aesthetically highly prized by collectors

HONG KONG: An extremely rare, vivid purple-pink diamond mined in Russia is expected to fetch up to $38 million when it goes under the hammer on Nov. 11, the auction house Sotheby’s said on Monday.
The oval gem, which is named after a Russian ballet ‘The Spirit of the Rose’, is the largest of its kind to be offered at auction. The trend for colored stones has increased as an asset class by the super-rich in recent years.
Mined by Russian diamond producer Alrosa, the 14.83-carat diamond was cut from the largest pink crystal ever found in Russia, Sotheby’s said.
“The occurrence of pink diamonds in nature is extremely rare in any size. Only one percent of all pink diamonds are larger than 10-carats,” said Gary Schuler, worldwide chairman of Sotheby’s jewelry division.
Naturally colored diamonds occur because they possess a particular lattice structure that refracts light to produce colored, rather than white, stones.
Pink diamonds are both rare and aesthetically highly prized by collectors, analysts say.
The gem is being shown in Hong Kong, Singapore and Taipei before being auctioned in Geneva on Nov. 11.


Magicians mark 100 years of sawing people in half

Magicians mark 100 years of sawing people in half
Updated 15 January 2021

Magicians mark 100 years of sawing people in half

Magicians mark 100 years of sawing people in half
  • They came, they sawed, they conquered
  • London-based Magic Circle organization will host the celebrations

LONDON: He came, he sawed, he conquered. One hundred years ago on Sunday, illusionist P.T. Selbit put a woman in a box on the stage of London’s Finsbury Park Empire and sawed right through the wood, creating a magical classic.
Now, 100 years on, magicians from around the world will be getting together online this weekend to celebrate the centenary of that landmark performance.
“This took off and became the most influential and the most famous illusion, in my opinion, that there’s ever been,” said magician and historian Mike Caveney who is writing a book on the illusion.
“The magician wasn’t doing this trick to an inanimate object. He was doing it to a human being, which raised it up to a whole new level.”
In the original version, the saw went through, the box was opened and the person emerged unharmed.
Down the years magicians developed refinements, with the two halves pulled apart. Celebrity magician David Copperfield came up with his own version “The Death Saw” where he was the one tied down to a platform as a giant rotary blade sliced him in two.
Sometimes he actually got injured, Copperfield said in an interview filmed for Sunday’s online event.
“I got cut a few times by the blade because the blade was a little bit off, you know, stages are different every theater you have,” Copperfield said.
The London-based Magic Circle organization will host the celebrations with a live streamed-event on Facebook from 1800 GMT on Sunday.
Guests will include Debbie McGee, the wife of the late British TV magician Paul Daniels, who will describe the many times she survived the procedure.