British Airways slapped with UK data watchdog’s biggest-ever fine

BA was fined for failing to protect personal and financial details of more than 400,000 of its customers. (File/AFP)
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Updated 16 October 2020

British Airways slapped with UK data watchdog’s biggest-ever fine

  • BA fined $25.85 million for failing to protect personal and financial details of more than 400,000 customers
  • The ICO said its investigators found BA should have identified weaknesses in its security and resolved them

BENGALURU: Britain’s data protection watchdog said on Friday it has fined IAG’s British Airways 20 million pounds ($25.85 million) — its biggest such penalty to date — for failing to protect personal and financial details of more than 400,000 of its customers.
“Their failure to act was unacceptable and affected hundreds of thousands of people, which may have caused some anxiety and distress as a result,” the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) said of a cyberattack the airline suffered in 2018.
IAG shares slid to session lows following the announcement. By 0917 GMT, they were 3% lower at 93.2 pence.
The regulator said it considered representations from BA and the economic impact of the coronavirus crisis on their business before setting a final penalty, which was considerably less than the 183.4 million pounds proposed last year.
The ICO said its investigators found BA should have identified weaknesses in its security and resolved them with measures available at the time, which would have prevented the cyberattack.
British Airways did not immediately respond to a Reuters request for comment.
($1 = 0.7736 pounds)


US to sue Google in biggest antitrust case in decades

Updated 20 October 2020

US to sue Google in biggest antitrust case in decades

  • The move comes after months of investigations by federal and state antitrust enforcers

WASHINGTON: The US government was preparing to sue Google Tuesday in what would be the biggest antitrust case in decades, media reports said.
The Wall Street Journal and New York Times said the Justice Department suit will accuse the California tech giant of illegal monopoly behavior to preserve its dominance in Internet search and advertising.
The move comes after months of investigations by federal and state antitrust enforcers seeking to check the power of the massive technology firm and parallel probes into other giants such as Amazon, Facebook and Apple.
It was not immediately clear what remedy the government was seeking in the suit, which could take years to resolve. But it could force changes in business practices or break off segments of the Google empire.
The Justice Department had no immediate comment but scheduled a briefing for media later Tuesday. Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment.