Foxconn aims to supply to about 3 million electric vehicles by 2027

Foxconn Chairman Liu Young-way. (Reuters)
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Updated 17 October 2020

Foxconn aims to supply to about 3 million electric vehicles by 2027

  • Foxconn is planning to launch its solid-state battery for EVs in 2024, which is a high-capacity energy storage device that improves on current batteries

TAIPEI: Foxconn aims to provide components or services to 10 percent of the world’s electric vehicles (EVs) by between 2025 and 2027, and has been in talks with multiple car manufacturers for future cooperation, Chairman Liu Young-way said on Friday.
The Taiwanese contract manufacturer, formally called Hon Hai Precision Industry and a major supplier to Apple, is looking at growth from sectors such as EVs, digital health and robots in a drive to diversify its global investments. “We want to push Taiwan’s EV industry to the world,” Liu said in Taipei.
In January, automaker Fiat Chrysler said it has plans for a joint venture with Foxconn to build electric cars and develop Internet-connected vehicles in China.
“Hon Hai has to ready our open platform as soon as possible. We need to move fast to grab market share,” he said, referring to Foxconn’s pledge to build an “open platform” to make key EV components including battery and car-Internet services available to automobile makers.

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Foxconn is planning to launch its solid-state battery for EVs in 2024.

Foxconn will work with multiple auto makers to reach the goal of 10 percent global EVs, Liu added, representing around three million vehicles.
Liu, however, declined to provide a revenue target for the EV business or details citing “ongoing talks.”
Foxconn is planning to launch its solid-state battery for EVs in 2024, which is a high-capacity energy storage device that improves on current batteries.
Foxconn’s Taipei-listed shares closed up 0.6 percent on Friday, outperforming the broad market, which ended 0.6 percent weaker.
Liu has said earlier this year that Foxconn was working to build supply chains in China and the United States, amid a years-long drive to diversify its investments around the world.

 


Ski resorts out in the cold as France eases lockdown

Updated 27 November 2020

Ski resorts out in the cold as France eases lockdown

  • Frustrated resort operators count the cost of holiday season restrictions

MEGEVE, France:  Megeve, in the foothills of Mont Blanc, was gearing up to welcome back skiers before Christmas after a COVID-19 lockdown was eased.

But France’s government — while allowing cinemas, museums and theaters to reopen from Dec. 15 — says its ski slopes must stay off limits until 2021, leaving those who make their living in the Alpine village frustrated and, in some cases, perplexed.

“When you’re outside, when you’re doing sport outdoors, that’s not the moment when you’re going to give COVID-19 to someone. COVID-19 is passed on in enclosed places,” said Pierre de Monvallier, director of ski school Oxygene, which operates in several resorts including Megeve.

Announcing a phased easing of the lockdown on Tuesday, French President Emmanuel Macron said it was “impossible to envisage” re-opening ski slopes for Christmas and New Year, and that he preferred instead to do so during January.

“It felt like the door had been slammed in our face,” said Catherine Jullien-Breches, the mayor of Megeve, whose green slopes are generally covered with snow by mid-December.

“Unfortunately it’s a real drama for the economies of the villages and the winter sports resorts.”

People who live within 20 km of France’s Alpine resorts will able to visit from this weekend, but with the lifts staying shut, the main draw is missing.

“It’s like going on holiday on the Cote d’Azur and being told the sea is off limits,” said David Le Scouarnec, co-owner of Megeve’s Cafe 2 la Poste.

The problem for the resorts — and the hotels, restaurants, and workers who depend on them for their livelihood — is that their season is short, and they will have little time after the New Year to claw back lost revenue.

Other European authorities are wrestling with the same problem. Italy’s resorts regions are seeking approval for restricted skiing, but Austria, whose biggest cluster of the first wave of the pandemic was at the ski resort of Ischgl — where thousands were infected — is skeptical.

Prevarication cuts little ice, however, with Mathieu Dechavanne, Chairman and CEO of Compagnie du Mont-Blanc, which operates cable cars at Megeve and other resorts.

He said who could not understand why the government allowed trains and metros to operate, but barred him from re-opening. “It’s like we’re being punished. We don’t deserve this. We’re ready.”