India warns Amazon, Flipkart over country of origin rule amid tensions with China

Amazon has often faced regulatory challenges in India. (Reuters)
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Updated 17 October 2020

India warns Amazon, Flipkart over country of origin rule amid tensions with China

  • A push for strict enforcement of the rule has come amid tensions between India and China
  • New Delhi has banned 177 Chinese mobile applications since June

MUMBAI: The Indian government has warned Amazon.com’s local unit and Walmart’s Flipkart that sellers on their platforms are not complying with a rule requiring that a product’s country of origin be specified.
A push for strict enforcement of the rule has come amid tensions between India and China following a border skirmish which began in June, and is part of India’s efforts to cut down on Chinese-made imports.
The two e-commerce firms have been given 15 days to explain the lapses or action will be taken against them, according to an Oct. 16 letter addressed to the companies from the Ministry of Consumer Affairs and seen by Reuters.
It did not specify what action may be taken, referring only to a legal act that has provisions for fines.
Representatives for Amazon and Flipkart did not immediately respond to Reuters requests seeking comment outside regular business hours.
In addition to enforcing the country of origin rule, New Delhi has also banned 177 Chinese mobile applications since June while Chinese goods in ports have faced extra scrutiny and delays.
Amazon has often faced regulatory challenges in India. Last year, the government enforced strict rules for foreign investment in e-commerce which forced the US retail giant to rework its business structures and strained ties between New Delhi and Washington.
In January, the Competition Commission of India ordered an investigation into Amazon and Flipkart over alleged violations of competition law and certain discounting practices, which Amazon is challenging, according to court filings.


50% of workers fear losing job in next 12 months: Global economic survey

Updated 9 min 3 sec ago

50% of workers fear losing job in next 12 months: Global economic survey

  • Saudi adults more optimistic of developing new skills for future jobs
  • 195m jobs lost worldwide amid COVID-19 pandemic: Egyptian minister

DUBAI: More than half the global workforce fears being made redundant in the next 12 months, according to a World Economic Forum-Ipsos survey.

The study, released on the eve of the World Economic Forum’s (WEF) Jobs Reset Summit, questioned 12,000 adults in 27 countries about employment prospects during the ongoing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic.

And although at least 50 percent were concerned about losing their jobs over the coming year, two-thirds of workers worldwide said they could learn the skills needed for the jobs of the future through their current employer.

In Saudi Arabia, less than 20 percent of those who took part in the survey were very concerned about their jobs disappearing, compared to 39 percent in Spain.

While the findings painted an overall gloomy picture of the global job situation amid the COVID-19 outbreak, they also highlighted green shoots of optimism, particularly in the Kingdom.

Around 18 percent of Saudi workers were not at all worried about losing their jobs, more than the global average of 17 percent.

On learning, Saudis were even more enthusiastic, with 39 percent confident of gaining the necessary skills to compete for the new job opportunities of the future.

During a WEF discussion on the impact of the global health crisis on employment, Rania Al-Mashat, the Egyptian minister for international cooperation, described the COVID-19 pandemic as a mix of many crises that had rendered 195 million people jobless around the world.

But she said that Egypt’s young population offered great opportunities for the country and the government had already rolled out plans to tap into youth development before the virus outbreak.

“The Egyptian government has taken comprehensive measures to reshape the education system incorporating a significant technology element to the sector and this turned out to be very useful for home schooling during the lockdown,” the minister added during a session titled, “Building a New Economy and Society.”

Al-Mashat pointed out that Egypt was adopting the principles of stakeholder capitalism, and in order to utilize the energies of its youth had been actively creating entrepreneurial space and building a strong digital infrastructure. She said there had been many policy movements, especially in the creation of gender equality accelerators.

Alan Jope, the CEO of Unilever and a speaker in the same session, said COVID-19 was not the only current world crisis, adding that economic, health, geopolitical, trade wars, climate change, capital wars, and a few looming military conflicts could be added to a global list of crises.

He also noted that gross domestic product (GDP) should not be considered the only economic measure. “Our measures for success need to change, we’ll have to look at social and environmental parameters, and not just the GDP.”

Jope predicted plenty of future jobs but not in traditional areas of work. “Most of the jobs will be created in the low-carbon sector, along with the IT and biotech industries,” he said.