Russian ties with Manila at ‘historic high’

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte. (Reuters/File)
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Updated 18 October 2020

Russian ties with Manila at ‘historic high’

  • Khovaev has been the longest-serving Russian envoy to Manila since assuming office in 2015

MANILA: Moscow’s Ambassador to Manila Igor Khovaev says that relations between the countries are at the “highest level in history” and gave credit to Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte for the improvement in diplomatic ties with Russia, particularly in the area of defense.

“I believe that we have all reasons to say that our bilateral relations are at the highest level in our history. Of course, after the election of ... President (Rodrigo) Duterte, absolutely new horizons (were) opened up,” Khovaev told Arab News.

“We highly appreciate an independent foreign policy pursued by President Duterte, and we understand that the diversification of the external ties of your country means keeping old friends and partners and getting the new ones.”

Khovaev added that Russia has always been clear that it is “ready to be a new reliable partner and a new good friend for the Philippines with no damage to (its) traditionally close relationships with other countries.”

Khovaev has been the longest-serving Russian envoy to Manila since assuming office in 2015.

As he nears the end of his tour of duty in Manila, he highlighted some of the major developments in bilateral ties between the Philippines and Russia.

“I arrived in Manila in April 2015. At that time, you had President (Benigno) Aquino. At that time, I couldn’t even imagine that it would be possible even to discuss possibilities for our bilateral defense and security cooperation,” he said.

However, with Duterte’s “independent foreign policy thrust,” he said, the bilateral engagement between the Philippines and Russia had “broadened,” resulting in the establishment of confidence-building activities between the two nations’ defense sector.

He said that the Philippines’ old and long-time allies “have no right to be jealous” or “to put any obstacles” in the way of bilateral cooperation.

Khovaev reiterated that under the present defense partnership, Russia was ready to supply the Philippines with sophisticated arms and weapons.

“We never offer secondhand arms and weapons. The same arms and weapons the Russian armed forces are using. Because we respect our partners,” he said.

Khovaev also cited a verbal agreement between the two countries on the acquisition of helicopters, without divulging any other details as “this cooperation requires a certain degree of confidentiality.”

“Many things are under consideration . . . but, everything is being done in the spirit of partnership and mutual trust. Because it’s not just a trading deal, we want to build a long-term partnership between our two countries,” the ambassador said.

“So, no political linkages, and no political meddling . . . we are ready to discuss any option of our cooperation.”

Khovaev added that another idea worth exploring was joint military exercises, which were “very possible.”

“We are ready to discuss it after the pandemic,” he said.

As a stepping stone for that initiative, officers from the Presidential Security Group (PSG) have already visited Russia for joint training sessions with their Russian colleagues.

“They shared their best practices with their Philippine counterparts. And I think it’s important for your country because the world is diversified . . . And it’s just pragmatic to use the best experience, the best practices of different countries in your own interest,” he said.

“We are ready to share our experience in defense building practices. We are ready to discuss anything you Filipinos want to help your country to increase your defense capabilities. I’m saying again, without any political linkage,” he said.

In the fight against terrorism, Khovaev said that Russia was open to an exchange of information, adding that the Philippines’ intelligence service had access to the Russian bank of information on terrorist organizations.

“Many things have been discussed during the consultations between the Russian security council and the Philippine National Security Council. This mechanism of consultations will be resumed after the pandemic. So, we have good channels for cooperation and dialogue,” he said.

Khovaev thanked the Philippines president for the positive momentum of ties capped by “unprecedented” multiple meetings between Duterte and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

On Wednesday, Duterte hailed Khovaev for his contribution in deepening defense ties when the envoy met the president for a farewell in Malacanang.

Duterte lauded Khovaev for his crucial role in redefining and reinvigorating Philippines-Russia relations.

“Key agreements were signed and consultative mechanisms established, particularly in the areas of defense and security, trade and economic cooperation, science and technology, and health,” Malacanang said in a statement.

Duterte noted Khovaev’s role in facilitating confidence-building measures and conferred him with the Order of Sikatuna, with the rank of Datu (Grand Cross), gold distinction.


Malaysian employers shocked, angry over fines ruling for overcrowded migrant workers’ lodgings

Updated 30 November 2020

Malaysian employers shocked, angry over fines ruling for overcrowded migrant workers’ lodgings

  • Businesses face penalties of more than $12,000 per worker for breaching new COVID-19-driven regulations

KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysian employers on Monday expressed their shock and anger over the government’s decision to impose a $12,277 fine for each foreign worker found to be living in overcrowded lodgings.

A number of company bosses said they were in a race against time to fall in line with the new criteria and avoid being hit with heavy penalties.

“Although many employers are rushing against time to fulfil the requirements, one of the main challenges industry players face is with the local councils,” Soh Thian Lai, president of the Federation of Malaysian Manufacturers (FMM), told Arab News.

He said local councils throughout the country were not prepared “to assist the industry with the required endorsements” to comply with the terms of the Employees’ Minimum Standards of Housing, Accommodations, and Amenities Act 446.

“This has led to the main reason for the delay (in providing more space for migrant workers),” he added.

The decision came as a surprise after the Human Resources Ministry (HRM) had set March 2021 as a deadline for all industries to comply with the act which requires employers to ensure that their workers had sufficient residential space.

Malaysian government minister, Ismail Sabri Yaakob, announced last week that the penalty would be imposed from Nov. 26, sending shockwaves through businesses.

Soh said to provide housing facilities for each worker, employers were being forced to create additional space.

“There is, however, a lack of suitable accommodation as there are limited hostels available. Converting shop-lots to dwelling space will take time and costs to renovate the space according to the specifications outlined in the regulations as well as meeting other requirements by local authorities,” he added.

Act 446 was fully implemented in September this year after the country’s parliament amended the previous jurisdiction which only covered housing aspects of more than 20 acres of the plantation and mining sector.

The new amendment, however, extends the rules to all employment sectors that provide housing for workers.

“Most companies are currently juggling their operations toward business recovery while trying their best to adhere to this legislative requirement to readjust the living quarters for their workers,” Malaysian Employers Federation (MEF) Executive Director Shamsuddin Bardan told Arab News.

Shamsuddin said that “the spike in (coronavirus disease) COVID-19 infections at a workplace involving foreign workers may have triggered the government” to call for the full compliance of Act 446 with immediate effect.

While the government “needs to contain the new infections” among foreign workers, it was also important to “assist employers,” he added.

“Many employers still depend on various government assistance, such as wage subsidies, to remain in business.

“It was only introduced on Aug. 30 and the government then decided to enforce the act in November, so the lead time given to employers to fully comply with the act was too short.

“It is costly to upgrade accommodations on the backdrop of a decreased cashflow from the COVID-19 pandemic,” Shamsuddin said.

Soh said Minister of Human Resources Saravanan Murugan had acknowledged some of the challenges involved and agreed, in principle, to a more educational approach for enforcement of the act.

“Following several taskforce meetings with the ministry to address compliance to labor laws by industry in recent months, it has been agreed that given these challenges, including the challenges faced due to the COVID-19 pandemic, industries would need some time to make the changes and improvements to the housing facilities,” he said.

The FMM said it had written to the government and reiterated a previous request “for a 12-month grace period, without the imposition of any immediate penalty.”

Meanwhile, Malaysian Rubber Glove Manufacturers Association (MARGMA) president, Supramaniam Shanmugam, told Arab News that 59 members of the association had expressed concerns over the “lack of time” to comply with all the requirements of Act 446.

“The Act 446 talks about the welfare of workers and one of the items to fulfil are the certificate of accommodation, which is done online, and our members have been advised to apply for it. So, what we are asking for is time,” he said.

MARGMA represents rubber glove manufacturers and employers, including leading industry players such as Top Glove and Supermax.

The HR minister and government labor department were both unavailable for comment.

The Malaysian director general of health, Noor Hisham Abdullah, recently called for employers to adhere to Act 446 “as a matter of public safety,” adding that “infections involving foreign workers needed to be addressed. The Ministry of Health urges employers to play a bigger role in tackling it.”

On Tuesday, Malaysia reported more than 1,200 new COVID-19 cases, adding to the national caseload of 65,697 infections.

According to the World Bank’s estimate, Malaysia houses at least 3 million foreign workers and is the sixth-largest migrant-receiving country in East Asia.

Indonesian workers make up to 39 percent of the total migrant workers population, followed by Nepal and Bangladesh at 24 and 14 percent, respectively, according to a report published in August by the Southeast Asia office of the Heinrich Boll Stiftung foundation.

Foreign workers in Malaysia are restricted to low-to-medium skilled industries such as construction, services, plantation, agriculture, manufacturing, and domestic work.