Y20 summit gives platform for voice of global youth

Y20 summit gives platform for voice of global youth
A combination of screen grabs from the virtual Y20 Summit are shown in this image.
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Updated 18 October 2020

Y20 summit gives platform for voice of global youth

Y20 summit gives platform for voice of global youth
  • A Y20 Summit communiqué was submitted to the Saudi education minister to be given to the G20

RIYADH: The three-day virtual Summit of the Youth 20 (Y20) engagement group of the G20 concluded on Saturday with a call on the world’s biggest economies to sustain efforts to empower the youth.

A communiqué prepared by the Y20 delegates included the following key policy recommendations to G20 leaders:

• Reform educational frameworks for upskilling the young workforce;

• Develop an entrepreneurial mindset through accessible resources;

• Representation, participation and inclusion in decision-making bodies; and

• Environment sustainability and combatting discrimination

Y20 Chair Othman Almoamar handed over the communiqué to Saudi Minister of Education Hamad Bin Mohammed Al-Shaikh, for him to pass on to the G20.

The Y20 Summit is one of eight official engagement groups under the G20 umbrella. It brought together a diverse range of speakers including Y20 delegates from around the world, the UN secretary-general, senior executives from leading corporations, NGOs, academic institutions, leaders from major intergovernmental organizations and pro-youth celebrities.

During the online ceremony on Saturday, Y20 Chair Almoamar said: “Within the Y20, we have completely changed the game this year. We looked at how to be innovative in a time when COVID-19 has created more restrictions than anything we’ve faced before.”

He noted that the “really tough advocacy work” of the delegates had resulted in at least one policy being accepted by the G20.

Speaking to what he termed “one of the most resilient generations ever… the future torch-bearers” he added that “we need to make sure that young people actually have a voice and are heard at the tables of decision-makers”, concluding that “you cannot wait for the world to come with their changes, you need to change the world yourself.” 

Earlier in the day, in a keynote speech, Saudi Arabia’s Y20 Sherpa Sarah Alkhedheiri noted that “nobody becomes a global citizen – we simply all are already global citizens.”

Speaking about how young people can become a “community of active global citizens” she urged young people to “take action – start where you are with what you have, and build from there.”

Alkhedheiri concluded that the Y20 delegates have “shown us the perfect example of active global citizens from all around the world.”

During each day of the Y20 Summit, the participants explored a different key theme that has been a focus of Y20 delegates throughout the year, and that complements the work of the G20.

Triple Olympic Gold winner Usain Bolt took part in a video Q&A with young people from around the world.

Bolt noted that “young people don’t have a voice” and urged that we “focus and believe in them, build them up, to make sure the world will be in safe hands.”

He noted the importance of young people gaining a good education.

As with the first two days, leaders from the United Nations spoke on Saturday.

In a session on sustainable recovery, Maimunah Mohd Sharif, Executive Director of UN Habitat, noted that “one small step is to envision a better normal."

Hiroshi Kuniyoshi, Managing Director and Deputy to the Director General, Directorate of External Relations and Policy Research, UNIDO, spoke of his concern that “almost 80% of youth employees are employed in informal jobs – zero hours contracts, temporary jobs.

They don’t have any social protection and the COVID-19 crisis is forcing the majority of young people to become further disempowered and disenfranchised.”

The summit was the culmination of work by the Y20 throughout 2020. The work of the Y20 began with a Y20 Inception event in Riyadh in March, which launched the group’s plans to be an active and impactful platform between young leaders and the leadership of the G20.

The Y20 working task forces prepared several white papers that explored key issues in more depth and developed a set of recommendations that G20 leaders should take to mitigate specific negative effects that COVID-19 is causing young people globally, particularly relating to education and the labor market.


Fraudsters up their game, posing as bank officials on the phone in Saudi Arabia

Fraudsters up their game, posing as bank officials on the phone in Saudi Arabia
Vishing that occurs during a telephone call aims to provoke fear in the victim so that customers will be more susceptible to giving out personal, financial, or security details. (shutterstock)
Updated 18 January 2021

Fraudsters up their game, posing as bank officials on the phone in Saudi Arabia

Fraudsters up their game, posing as bank officials on the phone in Saudi Arabia
  • The Saudi Central Bank has warned bank customers, both citizens and expatriates, not to fall victim to financial frauds being perpetrated by scammers

JEDDAH: Fraudsters have developed a new scam, contacting residents in Saudi Arabia and pretending to be bank staffers requesting customer details.
A number of Arab News staff have received such calls in recent weeks. One caller spoke Urdu while two other callers posing as senior officials from the headquarters of the bank spoke in English and Arabic with a local accent.
They used phone numbers that appeared to be local numbers but upon calling back, the lines failed to connect.
The racketeers collect phone numbers of customers and ring them up, saying that their bank account or ATM card requires immediate updating. The scammers use the information provided to gain access to their bank accounts.
Speaking to Arab News, Talat Zaki Hafiz, secretary-general of the Media and Banking Awareness Committee of Saudi banks, said: “Saudi banks represented by the Media and Banking Awareness Committee have repeatedly warned bank customers not to react to stray phone calls of any kind coming from unknown sources that ask to update their banking record or personal information.” He further confirmed that banks do not request such information through phone calls or SMS messages.
Mohammed Khurram Khan, a professor of cybersecurity at the King Saud University in Riyadh, told Arab News: “Phishing, an online scam which targets users through emails where individuals are encouraged to click on a link that takes them to fraudulent sites, was troubling people. Now it’s a different kind of scam known as ‘vishing,’ over-the-phone phishing, where scammers persuade users to share their banking information by impersonating a bank official.”

HIGHLIGHT

The racketeers collect phone numbers of customers and ring them up, saying that their bank account or ATM card requires immediate updating. The scammers use the information provided to gain access to their bank accounts.

Vishing that occurs during a telephone call aims to provoke fear in the victim so that customers will be more susceptible to giving out personal, financial, or security details.
Sharing his experience Zafar Hasan, an e-learning consultant in Riyadh, said: “I received a call from someone on an unknown mobile number who introduced himself as a bank employee and told me that my ATM card was going to be blocked. It required an immediate update so I should give my Iqama number (residence permit number) and sixteen-digit ATM card number. I felt something was fishy, so I told him that I would go personally to the bank to update the card.”
The Saudi Central Bank (SAMA) has warned bank customers, both citizens and expatriates, not to fall victim to financial frauds being perpetrated by scammers.
SAMA called on bank customers to take information only from the official channels of the bodies regulating the Kingdom’s financial and investment sectors and inform the competent security authorities about such fraudulent attempts.