Virtual Arab Fashion Week to kick of with guest appearance by Maya Diab

Arab Fashion Week will be streamed virtually on Facebook Inc. platforms from Oct. 21-24. (Supplied)
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Updated 18 October 2020

Virtual Arab Fashion Week to kick of with guest appearance by Maya Diab

DUBAI: Lebanese superstar Maya Diab is set to open Arab Fashion Week, which will be streamed virtually on Facebook Inc. platforms from Oct. 21-24, it was announced this week.

“The entire world is passing through a transitional period of stepping into the new world’s revolution which is governed by technology and artificial intelligence. We… are taking the right steps to ensure our fashion community is ready to be part of the big change” Jacob Abrian, founder and CEO of the Arab Fashion Council, said.

Arab Fashion Week will feature more than 30 fashion designers from across the Middle East, Europe and America, in addition to a day dedicated to Brazilian designers. Fashion enthusiasts will even be able to shop their favorite runway looks directly through Instagram and through the event’s shop-the-runway e-commerce platform.

Panel discussions, interviews and talks will also be held by fashion experts in the region — with everything set to be streamed virtually.

This edition of Arab Fashion Week is presented by Microsoft.

“At a time when all sectors and industries are re-imagining their business models around the globe, the Arab fashion industry is no different, as it is set to drive a significant portion of its business in a challenging year through digital channels. The creative industry at large with its designers, creators, and the entire value chain are looking at new ways to innovate and differentiate, said Ihsan Anabtawi, COO and CMO of Microsoft UAE. “The Microsoft cloud and devices are supporting and empowering fashion designers and everyone in the industry to innovate, create, and collaborate in new ways while helping the industry meet changing customer demand in the digital age.”
 


‘On the Rocks’ — Bill Murray is a steal in this dad-daughter outing

Updated 25 October 2020

‘On the Rocks’ — Bill Murray is a steal in this dad-daughter outing

CHENNAI: Bill Murray is the most endearing aspect from “On the Rocks,” Sofia Coppola’s seventh film as writer-director. Behind his trademark deadpan expression, Murray still has twinkle and mischief in his eyes. And he brings out the same kind of lonely wistfulness we saw in his earlier association with Coppola in 2003’s “Lost in Translation,” in which he and Scarlett Johansson meet in a Tokyo hotel and find comfort in each other. There was no romance there, as there is none in his latest outing as Felix. Daughter Laura (played by Rashida Jones, who has starred in “I Love You, Man” and “The Social Network”) is troubled thinking that her life is about to go into a tailspin. 

“On the Rocks” is now on Apple TV+. Supplied

“On the Rocks” — on Apple TV+ and set in New York — is just as sentimental and sweet as “Lost in Translation.” As Coppola’s latest adventure begins, we see Felix, who has made his millions as an art dealer, in the lap of luxury with a chauffeured Mercedes, first-class hotels and sensational magic in his persona. But having divorced his wife many moons ago, he longs to nurture the relationship with his daughter Laura, who is married to the very successful Dean (Marlon Wayans) with two lovely daughters. 

However, in a kind of mid-marriage crisis, Laura begins to have doubts about Dean’s fidelity, especially after he gets busy with his new professional venture that takes him away on frequent trips. His “leggy” assistant, Fiona, accompanies him, and Laura confides this to her dad, who weaves stories of all that could be happening between Dean and his assistant. Felix suggests that they follow the possibly philandering husband, and a troubled Laura gets talked into it.

“On the Rocks” has great moments, and is compelling to a great extent. Supplied

All this leads to hilarious situations with Felix always being in command, even when cops catch him speeding as he is trying to tail Dean’s cab. Wittily calm and composed, he is the sort of guy who will unabashedly say to a passing stranger that she looks ravishing and get away with it, much to his daughter’s consternation.

“On the Rocks” has great moments, and is compelling to a great extent, with Murray engaging us with full-of-life banter. Jones matches up to him, a nervous wife tottering on the edge of what has been a great marriage. She hides her angst with remarkable alacrity, trying to play a good mother to her kids, while her dad leads her up the garden path. “On the Rocks” is happily no weepy tale, and Coppola spices it up.