China delays timetable for Boeing 737 MAX return

China  delays timetable for Boeing 737 MAX return
Grounded Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are seen parked in an aerial photo at Boeing Field in Seattle, Washington, on July 1, 2019. (REUTERS/File Photo)
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Updated 23 October 2020

China delays timetable for Boeing 737 MAX return

China  delays timetable for Boeing 737 MAX return
  • The best-selling 737 MAX was grounded around the world since March 2019 after two deadly crashes blamed on the plane's new navigation system 

BEIJING: China, the first country to ground Boeing Co’s 737 MAX following two fatal crashes, has not set a timetable for the plane’s return to service, the head of its aviation regulator said on Thursday.

The Civil Aviation Administration of China has set three principles for the jet to return to service in China, Feng Zhenglin, director at the agency, said.

Design changes need to be certified, pilots need to receive proper training and effective improvements need to be made to address the specific findings of investigations into the crashes, Feng said.

“Based on these three principles, we have not set a timetable for Boeing 737 MAX’s return to service here. As long as these conditions are met, we’re happy to see the MAX return to service in China,” said Feng.

“But if these conditions cannot be met, we still have to carry out strict airworthiness certification in order to ensure safety.”

The 737 MAX, which has been grounded around the world since March 2019, is expected receive regulatory approval from the European Union Aviation Safety Agency to resume flying in November.

The US Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) has not publicly disclosed a timeline for the MAX’s return of service, but sources familiar with the matter have said it is expected to lift its grounding order around mid-November, although the date could slip.

American Airlines has said that it plans to return the jet to service at the year-end, subject to FAA approval.


Malaysia takes legal action against EU over palm biofuel curbs

Malaysia takes legal action against EU over palm biofuel curbs
Updated 17 January 2021

Malaysia takes legal action against EU over palm biofuel curbs

Malaysia takes legal action against EU over palm biofuel curbs
  • Palm oil constitutes 30 percent of the global oils and fats production

KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia is taking legal action at the global trade watchdog against the EU and member states France and Lithuania for restricting palm oil-based biofuels, the government said.

The world’s second largest palm oil producer, which has called a EU renewable-energy directive “discriminatory action,” is seeking consultations under the WTO’s Dispute Settlement Mechanism, the Plantation Industries and Commodities Ministry said in a statement.

Minister Mohd Khairuddin Aman Razali said the EU proceeded with implementing the directive without considering Malaysia’s commitment and views, even after Malaysia gave feedback and sent economic and technical missions to Europe.

The EU directive “will mean the use of palm oil as biofuel in the EU cannot be taken into account in the calculation of renewable energy targets and in turn create undue trade restrictions to the country’s palm oil industry,” he said in the statement.

The ministry filed the WTO request with cooperation from the Attorney General’s Chambers and the International Trade and Industry Ministry, taking action it had warned of in July against EU Renewable Energy Directive II.

Malaysia will act as a third party in a separate WTO case lodged by neighboring Indonesia, the world’s biggest palm oil producer, as a sign of solidarity and support, the ministry statement said.

Indonesia and Malaysia, together account for 85 percent of the global output of palm oil. Palm oil constitutes 30 percent of the global oils and fats production, and plays a significant role in fulfilling the demand in the global oils and fats market.

It is the world’s most produced and traded edible oil, and its versatility can be seen through its use in a wide range of food and nonfood products, which led to the remarkable palm oil consumption growth.

The US imported approximately $410 million of crude palm oil from Malaysia in 2020, CNN reported.