What We Are Reading Today: Brave New Home

What We Are Reading Today: Brave New Home
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Updated 24 October 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Brave New Home

What We Are Reading Today: Brave New Home

Author: Diana Lind

Diana Lind’s Brave New Home “is one of those invaluable books that offer a new, revelatory window on familiar problems.” said Liza Featherstone in a review for The New York Times.
“Faced with a host of societal challenges — economic inequality, loneliness, housing precarity, environmental degradation — Lind convincingly argues that the single-family home is at least partly to blame,” Featherstone added.
“This cultural obsession, Lind shows, was manufactured by 20th-century policymakers and real estate developers wanting to populate the suburbs, as well as media-fueled — often racist and elitist — panics over the unwholesomeness of cities for families,” said the review.
Featherstone said Lind “rightly contends that the single-family home is an impossible dream for many, fueling inequality.”
The single-family home also “gives its inhabitants far more space than they require, wastefully encouraging them to acquire unnecessary stuff and use far too much energy on heating, cooling and lighting,” said the review.
Featherstone is the author, most recently, of Divining Desire: Focus Groups and the Culture of Consultation.


What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo

What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo
Updated 16 January 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo

What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo

From the author of the New York Times bestseller So You Want to Talk About Race, a history of white male America and a scathing indictment of what it has cost us.
After the election of Donald Trump, and the escalation of white male rage and increased hostility toward immigrants that came with him, New York Times-bestselling author Ijeoma Oluo found herself in conversation with Americans around the country, pondering one central question: How did we get here?
Oluo answers that question by pinpointing white men’s deliberate efforts to subvert women, people of color, and the disenfranchised. Through research and interviews, Oluo investigates the backstory of America’s growth, from immigrant migration to our national ethos around ingenuity, from the shaping of economic policy to the protection of sociopolitical movements that fortify male power. In the end, she shows how white men have long maintained a stranglehold on leadership and sorely undermined the pursuit of happiness for all, according to a review at goodreads.com.