‘Baby Shark’ becomes most-watched YouTube video

‘Baby Shark’ becomes most-watched YouTube video
“Baby Shark Dance,” the English-language version of the song, clocked up over seven billion views on YouTube at around 0400 GMT on Monday. (YouTube)
Short Url
Updated 02 November 2020

‘Baby Shark’ becomes most-watched YouTube video

‘Baby Shark’ becomes most-watched YouTube video
  • South Korea-produced song has gone from the realm of children’s YouTube to a global viral sensation
  • Two of the last four tracks to hold the most-played record on YouTube are South Korean

SEOUL: The wildly infectious and relentlessly repetitive children’s song “Baby Shark” became the most-watched YouTube video on Monday, with more than seven billion plays.
The bane of parents and teachers worldwide, the South Korea-produced song has gone from the realm of children’s YouTube to a global viral sensation, with a catchy and addictive melody buoyed by a hypnotically colorful video.
“Baby Shark Dance,” the English-language version of the song, clocked up over seven billion views on YouTube at around 0400 GMT on Monday, dethroning Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee’s “Despacito” as the most-watched video on the platform.
The ubiquitous children’s song and earworm, first uploaded to YouTube in June 2016, is a remix of an American campfire song by the Seoul-based production company Pinkfong.
Its YouTube success paved its route into the global music charts, reaching the number 32 spot on the Billboard Hot 100 in January 2019.
It has picked up plenty of adult fans along its way to global viral fame: the Washington Nationals baseball team took it up as an anthem and went on to win the World Series last year, prompting the White House to play the tune during the celebrations.
One US town played the song on a loop, while another, Florida’s West Palm Beach, used the melody to try to discourage homeless people from congregating in a public area.
It has also been pressed into anti-pandemic service, with a coronavirus-themed version, “Wash Your Hands,” teaching children the importance of personal hygiene.
Two of the last four tracks to hold the most-played record on YouTube are South Korean – rapper Psy’s megahit “Gangnam Style” held the title for more than three years until it was dethroned by Wiz Khalifa’s “See You Again.”


‘I’m not striving for world domination!’: Adolf Hitler namesake wins Namibia election

Despite the unfortunate name, the full-named Adolf Hitler Uunona, 54, who won an election in Namibia told German newspaper Bild that he did not share the Fuhrer’s ideology. (Eagle FM/AFP/File Photos)
Updated 03 December 2020

‘I’m not striving for world domination!’: Adolf Hitler namesake wins Namibia election

Despite the unfortunate name, the full-named Adolf Hitler Uunona, 54, who won an election in Namibia told German newspaper Bild that he did not share the Fuhrer’s ideology. (Eagle FM/AFP/File Photos)
  • The councillor, whose father named him after the National Socialist leader, won 85 per cent of the vote in the country’s Oshana region

LONDON: A politician named after Nazi leader Adolf Hitler has won a regional election in Namibia.

The councillor, whose father named him after the National Socialist leader, won 85 per cent of the vote in the country’s Oshana region, with 1,196 votes over his opponent’s 213.

Despite the unfortunate name, the full-named Adolf Hitler Uunona, 54, told German newspaper Bild that he did not share the Fuhrer’s ideology and entered politics originally to fight apartheid in southern Africa.

“That I have this name doesn’t mean that I want to subjugate Oshana now. It doesn’t mean that I’m striving for world domination. My father named me after this man. He probably didn’t understand what Adolf Hitler stood for,” the region’s new district administrator said.

“It was a completely normal name for me as a child. It wasn’t until I was growing up that I realized that this man wanted to subjugate the whole world. I have nothing to do with any of these things.”

According to media reports, his wife calls him Adolf and he usually appears in public as Adolf Uunona, leaving out the “Hitler.” But he said it was too late to change his name or update the ballot, adding: “It’s on all the official documents.”

Adolf, or Adolph, is not an uncommon name in the former German colony of Namibia, however most of those still alive with the name were alive before the Second World War.

Namibia still has communities of German-speaking people and is visited by 120,000 Germans each year.

There are German-language newspapers, radio stations, road names, place names and a small German-speaking minority.