Kanye West gives up on 2020 White House bid, eyes 2024

Kanye West gives up on 2020 White House bid, eyes 2024
Kanye West launched his campaign for the White House in July, above, with erratic statements that raised concerns over his mental health. (Reuters)
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Updated 04 November 2020

Kanye West gives up on 2020 White House bid, eyes 2024

Kanye West gives up on 2020 White House bid, eyes 2024
  • Kanye West’s celebrity wife, Kim Kardashian, did not appear to be supporting his bid
  • The 21-time Grammy Award winner loaned $6.7 million to his campaign

LOS ANGELES: Rapper Kanye West on Tuesday voted for himself as the next US president after a long-shot campaign marked by erratic statements and speculation that he might siphon some Black votes from Democrat Joe Biden.
Late on Tuesday evening, the singer and fashion designer appeared to concede his 2020 bid had ended but suggested his quest was not over. He posted a picture of himself in front of an electoral map saying “WELP KANYE 2024.”
Earlier, the singer and fashion designer tweeted that he was “voting for the first time in my life for the President of the United States, and it’s for someone I truly trust ... me.”
He later posted video of himself casting his vote in Cody, Wyoming, where he wrote himself in on the ballot.
West, 43, got onto the presidential ballot in a handful of states, although not in battlegrounds like Florida, Pennsylvania and Michigan. He has spent recent weeks instructing followers how to vote for him as a write-in candidate elsewhere.
West’s celebrity wife, Kim Kardashian, did not appear to be supporting his bid. She has given no public endorsements of her husband and on Tuesday she retweeted a message about voter hot lines from Democratic vice presidential contender Kamala Harris.
West, once one of Trump’s biggest celebrity supporters, launched his campaign for the White House in July with erratic statements that raised concerns over his mental health. The 21-time Grammy Award winner said in 2018 that he suffers from bipolar disorder.
West loaned $6.7 million to his campaign, according to a filing with the Federal Election Commission, and in a recent video emphasized religion and family values.


Australia’s Great Barrier Reef status lowered to critical and deteriorating

Updated 03 December 2020

Australia’s Great Barrier Reef status lowered to critical and deteriorating

Australia’s Great Barrier Reef status lowered to critical and deteriorating
  • Australia’s northeastern coast has lost more than half its coral in the past three decades

MELBOURNE: The health of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, the world’s most extensive and spectacular coral reef ecosystem, is in a critical state and deteriorating as climate change warms up the waters in which it lies, an international conservation group said.
The World Heritage-listed site off Australia’s northeastern coast has lost more than half its coral in the past three decades.
Coral-bleaching in 2016, 2017 and 2020 has further damaged it health and affected its animal, bird and marine population, the International Union for Conservation of Nature said in a report.
Such bleaching occurs when hotter water destroys the algae which the coral feeds on, causing it to turn white.
The union moved the reef’s status to critical and deteriorating on its watchlist.
Some activities which threaten it, like fishing and coastal development, can be tackled by the management authorities, the union said.
“Other pressures cannot be addressed at the site level, such as climate change, which is recognized as the greatest threat,” it said.
Progress toward safeguarding the reef under a long-term sustainability plan through to 2050 has been slow and it has not been possible to stop its deterioration, it said.
The turtle populations — including loggerhead, hawksbill and northern green — as well as the scalloped hammerhead shark, many seabird populations and possibly some dolphin species are declining.
Efforts to safeguard the reef are rising, however. HSBC and the Queensland government said in October they would buy “Reef Credits,” a tradable unit that quantifies and values the work undertaken to improve water quality flowing onto the reef.
Similar to the carbon offset market which incentivizes the reduction of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, the scheme pays landholders for improved water quality.