Dubai Design Week: ‘Fata Morgana’ connects culture, history and people

Dubai Design Week: ‘Fata Morgana’ connects culture, history and people
A rendering of ‘Fata Morgana,’ now on show at Dubai Design Week. (Supplied)
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Updated 09 November 2020

Dubai Design Week: ‘Fata Morgana’ connects culture, history and people

Dubai Design Week: ‘Fata Morgana’ connects culture, history and people

DUBAI: Iraqi designer Hozan Zangana’s “Fata Morgana” won the sixth edition of the Abwab commission, an open call for regional designers to envision an architectural or design pavilion at Dubai Design District (d3) during Dubai Design Week.

Responding to the theme of the role of installations in shaping public space, “Fata Morgana” — made in close collaboration with Luuk Disveld of generous.studio and Joseph Crickett from WoodCast Designs — provides a conceptual framework for a city. Inspired by the UAE, with seven pillars representing each emirate, in-depth research contextualized its materials and production, with aesthetic nods to the desert.

“Fata Morgana is a phenomenon in the desert, a shimmering beacon in the distance,” explained Zangana. “The installation provokes that same interest.”




Using ancient adobe and rammed earth buliding techniques as a starting point, the structure from WoodCast Designs is paired with reflective copper to catch the sunlight. (Rendering supplied)

Using ancient adobe and rammed earth buliding techniques as a starting point, the structure from WoodCast Designs is paired with reflective copper to catch the sunlight. Organic in concept and production, “the output was a little bit out of our hands,” say the designers. “You can manipulate it – and we did – with pigment and the moulds, but every brick that came out was a surprise. These imperfections made it very exciting to work with.”

The playful installation invites curiosity, closer inspection and discovery from viewers who come together to experience a space designed for reflection and interaction.

 Though considerate of COVID-19 social distancing precautions, the work highlights the human need to cross paths by arranging open-plan Zangana-designed seating and tables around a central point. “The installation, with different levels in height, can be seen as a skyline with the seven pillars in the middle and the smaller ones around them,” noted Zangana. “The center is where people connect.”

 “It was an important insight that although we are separated because of coronavirus or cultural backgrounds, we have to find a way to create connections,” the designers said. With its mindful design, the installation “gives the visitor a safe and comfortable feeling. As they are facing each other, people are forced to look at each other and that is where the connection starts.”


Model Imaan Hammam takes a break from social media

Imaan Hammam is currently one of the most in-demand models on the scene. File/AFP
Imaan Hammam is currently one of the most in-demand models on the scene. File/AFP
Updated 23 January 2021

Model Imaan Hammam takes a break from social media

Imaan Hammam is currently one of the most in-demand models on the scene. File/AFP

DUBAI: Model Imaan Hammam is taking a social media break “to reset and reflect,” she revealed this week. 

The Dutch catwalk star, who was born to an Egyptian father and a Moroccan mother, took to her Instagram platform to raise awareness about mental health in light of “Blue Monday,” the third Monday in January, which is dubbed to be the most gloomy day of the year.

Urging her one million followers to prioritize their mental well-being, Hammam posted a photo of herself wearing a yellow t-shirt bearing a number for the mental health crisis hotline. 

She wrote: “(Wednesday) was a really exciting step forward for the US. But as we celebrate, I also want to remember that the day-to-day struggles people are facing — especially with mental health — don’t just disappear with a new administration. This past Monday (#BlueMonday) was the supposed scientifically proven most depressing day of the year.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Imaan Hammam (@imaanhammam)

She went on to encourage her followers to check out music collective Enjoy Being in Transition’s new trilogy of mixes curated by one of fashion’s favorite sound designers, Michel Gaubert, in order to bring peace and harmony and “to be a source of relief and inspiration for a society feeling the fatigue and the effects of depression from this past year.” She even plugged the link to the Blue Room playlist in her Instagram bio.

The 24-year-old also announced that she has started releasing monthly Spotify playlists in an effort to help uplift her fans’ spirits. 

“Speaking of mental health,” she concluded, “I am going to take a little break from social for a bit, just to reset and reflect. Sending you guys love and I’ll be back soon.”

Hammam isn’t the only supermodel to take a break from social media to prioritize their mental health in recent weeks. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Bella (@bellahadid)

Part-Palestinian catwalker Bella Hadid briefly abandoned the photo-sharing social media platform at the beginning of this month. 

A few weeks after departing, Hadid explained to her 38 million followers why she felt she needed to quit. 

“I took some time away to reflect and learn about myself in a way that would be too much to explain at the moment, but with time I will express,” the model wrote. “The memories and fortune I came back with are pure wisdom, a closer relationship with myself and my spirituality, a sense of self-love that I have always lacked, a few great friends, and these books that saw me through.”